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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 190 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 13 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Spanish Fort (Alabama, United States) or search for Spanish Fort (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
o, and Chickamauga, down to those last days when a remnant under Gibson held Canby and his 40,000 veterans in check at Spanish Fort. If the Army of Northern Virginia was the sword of the Lord and of Gideon—sheathed by the mighty hand of Lee at App the Virginia army, became in the Army of Tennessee the peer of the battalion, and how, in every battle from Shiloh to Spanish Fort, in Mobile bay, they challenged the record of the older companies, compelling by their gallantry and distinguished serPeach Tree creek, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Mill Creek gap, Columbia, Franklin, second Murfreesboro, Nashville, and Spanish Fort in Mobile bay, Alabama. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, in our trenches, We lay along the battery's side, Below the sr And knew that the end was near. April 2, the lines were broken. By a singular coincidence the Fifth Company held Spanish Fort, Mobile bay, and a detachment of the Washington Artillery were in Fort Gregg—the two last forts held by our two armies
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Army of Tennessee. (search)
Northern Virginia as the sword of her right hand; while in her left the Western army guarded 1,000 miles of front. If glory gleamed from our flashing falchion in the east at Manassas, and Richmond, and Chancellorsville, and in the Valley, the shield of the west bore all the tests of as high a resolution, and of as noble endurance at Shiloh, and Perryville, and Murfreesboro, and Chickamauga, down to those last days when a remnant under Gibson held Canby and his 40,000 veterans in check at Spanish Fort. If the Army of Northern Virginia was the sword of the Lord and of Gideon—sheathed by the mighty hand of Lee at Appomattox—verily, when the weeping eyes of our women were turned to where you guarded so long and well, the heart of the Confederacy, through the noise of the lamentation, a voice went up, crying, This is, indeed, my shield and my buckler. And so may it ever be. May you, veterans of the Army of Tennessee, by the arms of your vigorous manhood and the counsels of your matur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
roceed, I shall encroach upon the preserves of my friends, who, in their turn, are to tell you what, I am certain, will be found more to your taste and more interesting than the dry narrative of The Rise and Progress of the Washington Artillery. You will hear from the lips of the gallant Chalaron how the Fifth Company, jealous of the fame of the first four companies of the Virginia army, became in the Army of Tennessee the peer of the battalion, and how, in every battle from Shiloh to Spanish Fort, in Mobile bay, they challenged the record of the older companies, compelling by their gallantry and distinguished service the highest encomiums. To Adjutant Owen (in connection with these proceedings I cannot say General Owen) has been assigned the duty of tracing the career of the battalion from Bull Run in the east and Shiloh in the west, to the melancholy end. He will tell you like a true soldier, with fire and fancy, a soldier's story of the marches and battles, the trials and tri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
With scream of shot and burst of shell And bellowing of the mortars. In the west battles followed in quick succession. Peach Tree creek, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Mill Creek gap, Columbia, Franklin, second Murfreesboro, Nashville, and Spanish Fort in Mobile bay, Alabama. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, in our trenches, We lay along the battery's side, Below the smoking cannon, But— The enemy's mines had crept surely in, And the end was coming fast. It was smoke and roar and powder stench, And weary waiting for death. So the men plied their hopeless war And knew that the end was near. April 2, the lines were broken. By a singular coincidence the Fifth Company held Spanish Fort, Mobile bay, and a detachment of the Washington Artillery were in Fort Gregg—the two last forts held by our two armies. Fort Gregg, a detached work south of Petersburg, was defended by 150 Mississippians, of Harris's brigade, and two guns of the Washington Artillery, under the intrepid McElroy
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our fallen comrades. (search)
s gallant Captain, Cuthbret H. Slocomb, returns through me to those who bore it, and with their assent I commit it to the custody and safe-keeping of this battalion. You are charged to guard it well, for it has been borne upon many a battle into the thickest of the fight by strong arms which are now cold in death; it has been followed by our brave comrades, who have fallen under its folds. It was almost the last flag that floated over Confederate troops at the close of the war, and when Spanish Fort was evacuated, it was sewed around the body of Orderly Sergeant Bartley, to be yielded only with his life. It comes to us through the hands of the noble wife of that gallant chief, whose untimely death will ever be lamented, not only by this command, but by all of the people of this great city, and of this State—by all good men and women everywhere, who love courage, fidelity and patriotism. There are other leaders among our honored dead whose names and leadership are worthy to be ass