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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 64 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 49 49 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 41 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 40 2 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 38 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Stevenson (Alabama, United States) or search for Stevenson (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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oners, of which fifty-nine were commissioned officers. We captured, besides, six pieces of artillery, many small arms, considerable camp equipage, and large quantities of commissary and quartermaster's stores. After the expulsion of his rebel army from Middle Tennessee, Bragg retreated across the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River upon Chattanooga, which he fortified, and threw up defensive works at the crossings of the river as far up as Blythe's Ferry. Having put the railroad to Stevenson in condition to forward supplies, Rosecrans on the sixteenth of August commenced his advance across the Cumberland Mountains, Chattanooga and its covering ridges on the south-east being his objective point. To command and avail himself of the most important passes, the front of his movement extended from the head of Sequatchie Valley, in East-Tennessee, to Athens, Alabama, thus threatening the line of the Tennessee River from Whitesburgh to Blythe's Ferry, a distance of one hundred and fi
elf over a long, mountainous, and almost impassable road from Stevenson, Alabama, to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and his fears that General Rosecrying halfrations to the troops by the long and tedious route from Stevenson and Bridgeport to Chattanooga over Waldrous Ridge. They could noof the mountain. The summit itself was held by three brigades of Stevenson's division, and these were comparatively safe, as the only means ge's corps; and on the top of the mountain were three brigades of Stevenson's division. The pursuit — the fight on the Ridge In conformhe night; and the disjointed fragments of his force, belonging to Stevenson's division, were moved around to the right of his line in order tl of Walker's division, which was sent to the right, leaving only Stevenson's and Cheatham's divisions behind, both under command of General ed by General Gist, General Walker being absent,) Cheatham's, and Stevenson's divisions. Breckinridge's embraced his old division, commanded
d, and at the time I speak of had a considerable population. Since the commencement of the rebel conscription, a number of rebel officers with small squads of troops have been in the valley for the purpose of conscripting the inhabitants liable to military duty. Considerable numbers have been hurried away from their homes to the army, and others have been compelled to hide in the mountains to avoid a compulsory service in a cause they disliked. Since the occupation of the line between Stevenson and Huntsville, these squads have been doing picket-duty in our front. General Smith, as soon as the bridge was constructed, crossed with six regiments of his division, and made dispositions to capture these officers and their squads. Two regiments, under the command of Colonel A. D. Parry, of the Forty-seventh Ohio, were despatched to the junction of Santa Rosa and Town Creeks. A second force of two regiments, under Colonel Theodore Jones, of the Thirtieth Ohio, were sent to Gourd Nec
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 95.-reconnoissance to Dalton, Ga. (search)
country, comparatively unknown before. It has shown the tremendous strength of the enemy's position at Dalton. It has for ever set at rest the silly stories of Johnston's army having gone to Mobile and other points; and, above all, it has prevented that army, or any considerable part of it, from being so sent away. It was well ascertained that Cleburne's division did not start away until the evening of the twenty-first, and at least one brigade of it had returned by the twenty-fifth. Stevenson's, Stuart's, Loring's divisions, one brigade of Cleburne's, one of another division, whose commander could not be ascertained, and Wheeler's cavalry, were all known to have been in the fight of Thursday. Although this correspondent would be very glad to have Joe Johnston evacuate Dalton, he cannot but feel somewhat proud of this triumphant vindication of the statement he made weeks ago, and has since had occasion several times to repeat, concerning the presence and strength of the rebel a
e railroad, the command of Colonel Long driving the rebel infantry out of their camps immediately at the road. We continued in this position, skirmishing in front, for some time, when lines of the enemy's infantry commenced an advance upon us. A few well-directed rounds from the section of artillery, with the aid of a heavy skirmish-line, brought them to a halt and put them under cover. It was now near night, and learning from prisoners that Stewart's rebel division was in our front, and Stevenson's near by, and not knowing that it was possible to have any assistance during the night, at dusk I withdrew the forces, leaving the cavalry and Eightieth Illinois infantry at Neil's farm, and retired the residue to widow Burk's house, reported the facts, and rested for the night. February 25th. At early day Brigadier-General Cruft, division commander, promptly came up with the other two brigades, and by his orders all moved forward to Neil's farm, the enemy having reoccupied the ridge