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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Jonesborough (Alabama, United States) or search for Jonesborough (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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er day, nearly all of whom wished to embrace the terms of the President's Amnesty Proclamation, which, with Major-General Grant's General Order No. 10, of Headquarters Military Division of Mississippi, had been freely circulated within the rebel lines for some time previous. On the twentieth of January, General G. M. Dodge, at Pulaski, Tenn., having ascertained that a force of rebel cavalry under Roddy, was constructing flat-boats, and hiding them in Little Bear Creek, Spring Creek, and Town Creek, and also that one of Roddy's regiments was foraging on the north side of the Tennessee River, he immediately informed General Grant of these movements of the enemy, who directed me to organize an expedition at once, of sufficient force to drive Roddy away from where he was reported to be, and to destroy all boats and materials that might in any way be used by the enemy in crossing the Tennessee River. On the twenty-second, information was received that Johnson's and Morrow's brigades, of
making a stand for battle. Lebanon and Guntersville were both reached on Thursday, a number of rebel officers and men having been captured on the march. At Town Creek a lieutenant and two courier stations and five thousand seven hundred dollars in confederate money were captured. This money, it was ascertained, had been sentheeler and Roddy, estimated at four thousand five hundred, together with the force which had fallen back before his advance, were to concentrate the next day at Town Creek, at an admirable place for offensive operations, and which he was obliged to pass on his return. Smith had nothing but infantry and cavalry; no artillery and nurgh. He has had no severer test of his abilities as a general officer, than this expedition. The command left Lebanon on Wednesday, and reached and crossed Town Creek with no opposition. Here they halted for several hours. But the enemy refused to attack — positions were precisely the reverse of their well-laid plans. They