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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 101 37 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 20 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) or search for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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t, safe to its possessors, and was never confiscated. After the revolution, even to the present time, their rights have been respected like other titles to estates. So true it is, that the separation of private property from political questions tends to its security. The surrender of the pretended rights to government being completed, the two Jerseys were united in one province; and the government was conferred on Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, who, like Queen Anne, was the grandchild of Clarendon. New Jersey never again obtained a charter: the royal commission and the royal instructions to Lord Cornbury constituted the form of its administration. To the governor appointed by the crown belonged the power of legislation, with consent of the royal council and the representatives of the people. A freehold, or property qualification, limited the elective franchise. The governor could convene, prorogue, or dissolve the assembly at his will, and the period of its duration depended o
ilds Fort St. Louis, 29. Establishes missions, III. 121. Charles I., I. 194. Convenes a parliament, II. 2. Trial, 15. Charles II., his restoration, II. 29. Character, 48. Charleston founded, II. 169. Chauvin obtains a patent, I. 25. Chaumonot, Father, II. 144. Cherokees, III. 246. Treaty with, 332. Cheesman, Edmund, II. 230. Chickasas, Soto amongst, I. 49. Their residence, III. 160, 249. French wars with, 365. Visit Oglethorpe, 433. Chippewas, II. 150. Clarendon, ministry of, II. 435. Clarke, John, II. 61. Clayborne, William, I. 200, 236, 246, 249. Coligny plans settlements, I. 61-63. Colleton, James, II. 186. Colonies, Anglo-American, general character, II. 453. O:igin, 454. Christian, 455. Relations with parliament, III. 100. Taxation, 101. Judiciary, 103. Currency, 104. Charters, 107. Progress, 369. Settlements, 371. Schools, 373. Press, 374. Relations with metropolis, 380. Checks on their industry, 384. Sugar c
ritime discoveries, I. 7, 75, 76, 80. First attempt to plant a colony, 84. Favors colonization, 118. Early slave trade, 173. Claims Maine and Acadia, 148. Restrictive commercial policy of, 194. The reformation in, 274. Jealous of New England, 405. Its democratic revolution, II. 1. Long parliament, 4. Civil war, 8. Presbyterians and Independents, 9. Cromwell, 19. Restoration, 29. Navigation acts, 42. Royal commissioners for New England, 77. Its history from 1660 to 1688, 434. Clarendon's ministry, 435. The cabal, 435. Shaftesbury's, 436. Danby's, 437. Shaftesbury, 438. Tendency to despotism, 440. Tories and whigs, 443. Its aristocratic revolution, 445; III. 3, 9. War with France, 175. Queen Anne's war, 208. Resolves on colonial con-quests, 219. Sends a fleet into the St. Lawrence, 223. Seeks to engross the slave trade, 231. Extent of possessions, 235. Changes its dynasty, 322. Its pacific policy, 325. Claims of, 340. Relations with the colonies, 380. Wit