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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 101 37 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 20 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) or search for Clarendon, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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at the Charleston Hotel, last night, took his friends by surprise. Not withstand-the absence from the city of so large a proportion of our citizens, now on duty at the harbor batteries, quite a large concourse assembled with a brass band in front of the portico of the Charleston Hotel, and stirring strains of "Dixie" and the Marseillaise, succeeded by hearty calls for "Pryor, " finally brought out that gentleman. Just as he appeared, the line of the companies which had just arrived from Clarendon and Kershaw came in sight. They, however, were hurrying towards the boat, and could not wait to hear Mr. Pryor's speech. As the sound of their drums died away in the distance, Mr. Pryor rose, and after the cheering which had greeted him had subsided, addressed the assemblage. We extract one or two paragraphs from his speech " For this demonstration of your regard, I beg to return my grateful acknowledgments. I am here in Charleston in pursuance of a pledge, voluntarily given, that so s