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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 14, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Des Arc (Arkansas, United States) or search for Des Arc (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
iver, where it was easy for them to get from Little Rock. Arkansas, and escape back again if attacked. Lieutenant-Commander Bache was ordered up White River to suppress these raiders, whose zeal and persistency seemed without limit. The great Confederate armies of the West appeared to have been divided into small bodies, which could move with greater celerity. The Lexington, Cricket and Marmora were the vessels comprising Lieutenant Bache's command. On the arrival of the expedition at Des Arc, it burned a large warehouse filled with Confederate stores, which the thoughtless enemy had supposed was safe from the attack of gun-boats. On the second morning, on arriving off the mouth of Little Red River, a narrow and tortuous tributary of the White, the Cricket was sent up that stream in pursuit of two Confederate steamers, while the Lexington went twenty-five miles further up the White to Augusta. At that place Lieutenant-Commander Bache was informed that the indefatigable General