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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) or search for Hollywood (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
Wise, from a post-bellum commission in the State Line, became a prominent and useful citizen of Richmond. He was an accomplished gentleman, as frank and warm-hearted as he was courageous, and possessed powers of oratory of a high order. He died March 29th, 1897, in his fifty-eighth year, honored and widely beloved. and a large member of others killed and wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Wise and Major Hill survive, but Page lies at Blandsford Cemetery, Captain Wise, our brigade inspector, at Hollywood, and the body of Fitzhugh fell into the hands of the enemy. Poor fellow! he had heard his son was butchered at Battery No. 5 by the colored troops, after his surrender; the last that I saw of him he was in tears swearing the Hannibal's oath that he would at every hazard avenge his son's death. The story was false, his son was captured only, and yet survives. After this commenced the life of the trenches and scenes like that of the Crater. Colonel Goode succeeded Page in the command of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. A Tribute to the memory of the gallant and accomplished soldier. An Ode by him. A monument proposed to be erected over his remains in Hollywood. Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia. For years as he lay helpless on a bed of physical anguish, which was only partially alleviated by opiates, the fortitude with which the accomplished gentleman and gallant soldier bore his constant suffering, was as pathetic as his gallantry in the field had been impressive. The representative of a family long seated in the State, an ancestor, William Colston, having been for years the clerk of Richmond county in the Seventeeth century, in General Colston were united the traits of the Virginian which are held in such regard. General Colston was twice married. His first wife was Louise M. Gardiner, the widowed daughter of Captain John Bowyer, of Thornhill, near Lexington, Rockbridge county, Virginia. Of this union two daughters survive: Mrs. Louise E