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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 128 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 74 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 69 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 22 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pine Bluff (Arkansas, United States) or search for Pine Bluff (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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what property they could, and, after a slight resistance, fled in disorder, pursued by our cavalry, and on the tenth September our troops took possession of the capital of Arkansas. Our loss in killed, wounded, and missing did not exceed one hundred. We captured one thousand prisoners, and such public property as the rebels had not time to destroy. After the capture of Little Rock, and while our cavalry were driving the main force of rebels south, the enemy attempted the recapture of Pine Bluff, but was repulsed with heavy loss. On the twenty-eighth of October, our troops occupied Arkadelphia, the enemy retreating to Red River. A large part of the military force in the Department of the Missouri has been employed during the past year in repelling raids, and in repressing the guerrilla bands of robbers and murderers who have come within our lines, or been organized in the country. Most of these bands are not authorized belligerents under the laws of war, but simply outlaws fr
so crippled as to make it necessary for him to stop. On the eighteenth, a forage team sent out by the quartermaster was captured by the enemy. This was the first disaster during the expedition. On the twentieth, a supply-train arrived from Pine Bluff, and on the twenty-second the empty train was sent back, escorted by a brigade of infantry, four pieces of artillery, and a proper proportion of cavalry. On the twenty-fifth, news was received that the train had been captured, and Lieutenant-C It is evident that the check received by General Banks, and his falling back to Grand Ecore, made a further advance by General Steele, with his small army, impossible. It was useless to hold Camden and depend upon supplies from this point or Pine Bluff. As the Red River expedition had been delayed, if not broken up, a return to Little Rock was the only alternative. The command has marched over three hundred miles, driven rebels nearly the whole time, giving them battle wherever they offer