Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Saybrook, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) or search for Saybrook, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fenwick, George -1657 (search)
Fenwick, George -1657 Colonist; came to America in 1636 to take charge of the infant colony of Saybrook (q. v.), in Connecticut. He returned to England, and came back in 1639, and from that time governed Saybrook till December, 1644, when its jurisdiction and territory were sold to the Connecticut colony at Hartford. Fenwick was one of the judges who tried and condemned Charles I. He died in England in 1657. Fenwick, George -1657 Colonist; came to America in 1636 to take charge of the infant colony of Saybrook (q. v.), in Connecticut. He returned to England, and came back in 1639, and from that time governed Saybrook till December, 1644, when its jurisdiction and territory were sold to the Connecticut colony at Hartford. Fenwick was one of the judges who tried and condemned Charles I. He died in England in 1657.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gardiner, lion 1599-1829 (search)
Gardiner, lion 1599-1829 Military officer; born in England in 1599; was sent to America in 1635 by the proprietors for the purpose of laying out a city, towns, and forts at the mouth of the Connecticut River. He built the fort which he called Saybrook after Lord Saye and Sele and Lord Brooke. In 1639 he purchased Gardiner's Island, at the extremity of Long Island, then known by the Indian name of Manchonat, and at first called Isle of Wight by Gardiner. He secured a patent for the island, which made it a plantation entirely distinct and separate from any of the colonies. It contains about 3,300 acres, and has descended by law of entail through eight lords of the manor, the last being David Johnson, who died in 1829. From him the property was passed through the hands of his two brothers and two sons. This is believed to be the only property in the United States which has descended by entail to its present holders (see entail of estates). The manor house built in 1775 is still
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Higginson, Francis 1588- (search)
Higginson, Francis 1588- Clergyman; born in England in 1588; was an eloquent Puritan divine, and accepted an invitation to the new Puritan settlement at Salem, to which place he emigrated in the summer of 1629, and where he died Aug. 6, 1630. His son John succeeded, became a teacher, chaplain of the fort at Saybrook, one of the seven pillars of the church at Guildford, and pastor of his father's church at Salem in 1660, where he continued until his death, Dec. 9, 1708. Francis Higginson was among the carefully selected company of pioneers in the founding of the colony of Massachusetts Bay, who landed at Naumkeag (afterwards named Salem), with John Endicott, in 1629. It was late in June when the little company arrived at their destination, where the corruptions of the English Church were never to be planted, and Higginson served the people in spiritual matters faithfully until his death. With the same company came two excellent brothers, John and Samuel Browne. Both were mem
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mason, John 1610- (search)
for New England and its vice-president. He was also judge of the courts of Hampshire, England, in 1665, and in October was appointed viceadmiral of New England. He died, in London, in December, 1635, and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Mason's heirs sold his rights in the province of New Hampshire in 1691 to Samuel Allan. Indian fighter; born in England in 1600; served as a soldier under Fairfax in the Netherlands, and was invited by that leader to join his standard in the civil war. He came to America in 1630, and was one of the first settlers of Dorchester. Captain Mason led the white and Indian troops against the Pequods near the Mystic in 1637 (see Pequod War), and was soon afterwards made major-general of the Connecticut forces, a post he held until his death in Norwich, Conn., in 1672. He was a magistrate from 1642 until 1668, and deputygovernor from 1660 to 1670. He went to Saybrook after the Pequod War at the request of the settlers, and in 1659 removed to Norwich.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Saybrook, attack on (search)
Saybrook, attack on Early in April, 1814, a number of British barges, supposed to contain about 220 men, entered the Connecticut River, passed up 7 or 8 miles, and landed at a place called Pettipaug (a part of Saybrook), where the invaders destroyed about twenty-five vessels. This disaster caused the governor of Connecticut (Smith) to call out the militia for the defence of the sea-coast of the State. Saybrook, attack on Early in April, 1814, a number of British barges, supposed to contain about 220 men, entered the Connecticut River, passed up 7 or 8 miles, and landed at a place called Pettipaug (a part of Saybrook), where the invaders destroyed about twenty-five vessels. This disaster caused the governor of Connecticut (Smith) to call out the militia for the defence of the sea-coast of the State.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Saybrook platform. (search)
Saybrook platform. A colonial synod was held at Saybrook, Conn., Sept. 9, 1703, by legislative command, to frame an ecclesiastical constitution. That synod agreed that the confession of faith assented to by the synod in Boston in 1680 be recommended to the General Assembly, at the next session, for their public testimony tSaybrook, Conn., Sept. 9, 1703, by legislative command, to frame an ecclesiastical constitution. That synod agreed that the confession of faith assented to by the synod in Boston in 1680 be recommended to the General Assembly, at the next session, for their public testimony to it as the faith of the churches of the Connecticut colony; and that the heads of agreement assented to by the united ministers, formerly called Presbyterian and Congregational, be observed throughout the colony. It also agreed on articles for the administration of church discipline. This was called the Saybrook platform. In OcSaybrook platform. In October the legislature of Connecticut passed an act adopting the platform then constructed as the ecclesiastical constitution of the colony. This system, so closely Presbyterian, was favored by the Latitudinarians because it diminished the influence of unrestrained and bigoted church members and gave the more intelligent members g
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut, (search)
ndians.] Roger Williams, of Rhode Island, prevents a league between the Pequods and Narragansets......1636 Fort at Saybrook, at the mouth of the Connecticut, beleaguered by the Pequods all the winter of......1636-37 About thirty colonists oIndians and settled......1639 [Laws founded upon and administered according to the Scriptures.] Settlement made at Saybrook by George Fenwick......1639 Fourteen capital laws of Connecticut enacted, founded on passages of Scripture......Aprillaims under the Duke of York all land west of the Connecticut River......1675 Major Andros appears before the fort at Saybrook with an armed force and demands its surrender......July 11, 1675 [It is refused by Captain Bull, and the patent and c Canada......1709 First printer in the colony, Thomas Short, from Boston, at New London......1709 He publishes the Saybrook platform of Church discipline......1710 Settlement of the boundary with Massachusetts......1713 [Massachusetts gra
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Alphieus Starkey 1810- (search)
Williams, Alphieus Starkey 1810- Military officer; born in Saybrook, Conn., Sept. 10, 1810; graduated at Yale College in 1831; practised law in Detroit; and was editor of the Detroit Advertiser for a while. He served in the war with Mexico; was postmaster of Detroit (1849-53), and, made brigadier-general of volunteers in May, 1861, he organized the Michigan volunteers until September. In March, 1862, he became commander of a division in General Banks's corps, and at the battle of Cedar Mountain one-third of his division was killed or wounded. He commanded a division in Slocum's corps at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. In the Atlanta campaign he was conspicuous, and in November, 1864, succeeded Slocum in command of the 20th Corps, leading it in the celebrated march to the sea and through the Carolinas. From 1866 to 1869 he was minister to San Salvador, and from 1874 till his death, in Washington, D. C., Dec. 21, 1878, was a member of Congress.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Yale University, (search)
98, and the following year ten of the principal clergymen were appointed trustees to found a college. These held a meeting at New Haven and organized an association of eleven ministers, including a rector. Not long afterwards they met. Yale College, 1793. when each minister gave some books for a library, saying, I give these books for founding a college in Connecticut. The General Assembly granted a charter (Oct. Seal of Yale University. 9, 1701), and on Nov. 11 the trustees met at Saybrook, which they had selected as the place for the college, and elected Rev. Abraham Pierson rector. The first The old fence at Yale. student was Jacob Hemmingway, who entered in March, 1702, and was alone for six months, when the number of students was increased to eight, and a tutor was chosen. The site being inconvenient, in 1716 it was voted to establish the school permanently at New Haven, and the first college building was begun soon afterwards. It was finished in 1718, and at the co