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Cornelius Tacitus, The Life of Cnæus Julius Agricola (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cornelius Tacitus, The Life of Cnæus Julius Agricola (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb). You can also browse the collection for Agricola (Florida, United States) or search for Agricola (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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Cornelius Tacitus, The Life of Cnæus Julius Agricola (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb), chapter 7 (search)
The following year inflicted a terrible blow on his affections and his fortunes. Otho's fleet, while cruising idly about, cruelly ravaged Intemelii, a district of Liguria; his mother, who was living here on her own estate, was murdered. The estate itself and a large part of her patrimony were plundered. This was indeed the occasion of the crime. Agricola, who instantly set out to discharge the duties of affection, was overtaken by the tidings that Vespasian was aiming at the throne. He at once joined his party. Vespasian's early policy, and the government of Rome were directed by Mucianus, for Domitian was a mere youth, and from his father's elevation sought only the opportunities of indulgence. MARRIAGE, OFFICES, ADVANCEMENT Agricola, having been sent by Mucianus to conduct a levy of troops, and having done his work with integrity and energy, was appointed to command the 20th Legion, which had been slow to take the new oath of allegiance, and the retiring officer of whi
Cornelius Tacitus, The Life of Cnæus Julius Agricola (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb), chapter 46 (search)
that the true affection of thy nearest kin. This, too, is what I would enjoin on daughter and wife, to honour the memory of that father, that husband, by pondering in their hearts all his words and acts, by cherishing the features and lineaments of his character rather than those of his person. It is not that I would forbid the likenesses which are wrought in marble or in bronze; but as the faces of men, so all similitudes of the face are weak and perishable things, while the fashion of the soul is everlasting, such as may be expressed not in some foreign substance, or by the help of art, but in our own lives. Whatever we loved, whatever we admired in Agricola, survives, and will survive in the hearts of men, in the succession of the ages, in the fame that waits on noble deeds. Over many indeed, of those who have gone before, as over the inglorious and ignoble, the waves of oblivion will roll; Agricola, made known to posterity by history and tradition, will live for ever.