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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 2 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Fort Barrancas (Florida, United States) or search for Fort Barrancas (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
e on the disorganized crowd with two howitzers loaded with grape and canister, firing six rounds before they were out of range of the enemy's sharpshooters. All this time the schooner was burning rapidly, with a great blaze, by the light of which the sailors could see where the enemy had posted themselves on shore, and they were soon scattered. The schooner blazed up so rapidly that she soon broke from her moorings and, having burnt to the water's edge, floated off and sank opposite to Fort Barrancas. The boats remained near the place until it was certain that the Judah would never be of any more service to the Confederates, and then returned to the Colorado which they reached at daylight. Here they were welcomed with that heartiness which belongs to the sailors,who were on the alert to greet their chums and look after wounded messmates. To show the dangerous character of this expedition and the severity of the encounter, nearly one fifth of the boarding party were either killed