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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Fort Barrancas (Florida, United States) or search for Fort Barrancas (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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were beaten off with the loss of 200 men and one of the ships. The British ships also made an attack on Mobile, but retired without doing any material damage. General Jackson then marched with 4,000 men to Pensacola, drove the British from Fort Barrancas, and then proceeded to New Orleans, where, on January 8th, he won his great victory over the British General Pakenham. A month later a fleet of 38 British war vessels and 5,000 soldiers captured Fort Bowyer, but as peace had been declared, tth physically and intellectually. Though quite young while in Mexico, he was appointed military governor of Orizaba After the Mexican war he engaged in journalism. In 1861 he successfully performed the delicate duty of taking possession of Forts Barrancas and McRee at Pensacola. In April, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the Third Alabama infantry; was highly esteemed as a soldier; was promoted to a brigadier-gen- eralship, but before receiving his commission was killed while gallantly lead
sent out by General Wharton, March 18, 1863. (737) General Bragg tenders his thanks to Colonel Roddey and Colonel Patterson, and the gallant officers and men of their commands, for the interest manifested by them in perfecting their discipline and increasing their efficiency. (841) Detached from General Martin's brigade to join General Roddey's, Tullahoma, May 18th. (944, 961) In Roddey's brigade, Wheeler's corps, August, 1863. No. 41—(746) Mentioned by Capt. M. M. Young (Union), Barrancas, Fla., September 9, 1863; members of regiment arrested at house of Spanish consul. No. 42—(130) Total present, 372; sent to General Johnston, August 1, 1863. Nos. 53, 55, 56—In Roddey's brigade, Wheeler's corps, August to December, 1863. No. 57—(119) At Athens, Ala., January 26, 1864. (685) On Moulton road, April 24th. No. 58—(590) Roddey's brigade, Wheeler's corps, January 20th. No. 75—(756) Mentioned by General Pillow, Talladega, June 2d. No. 58—(515) M
ent Lomax was elected colonel, Cullen A. Battle, lieutenant-colonel, and Samuel Marks, major. On January 8, 1861, by order of Gov. A. B. Moore, the First regiment was sent against Fort Morgan and the Mount Vernon arsenal, and at the same time the Second regiment was ordered to report at Pensacola to General Chase, commander of Florida troops, and participated in the seizure of the Warrington navy yards and the forts on the Florida coast. The Second regiment captured the navy yard, and Forts Barrancas and McRae on January 10th and 11th, and soon afterward General Chase, Colonel Lomax and Lieutenant-Colonel Battle telegraphed to Senator Jefferson Davis, at Washington, for advice as to the propriety of an attack upon Fort Pickens, and received the reply: In the present condition of affairs Pickens is not worth one drop of blood. Not long after this the Alabama legislature passed the ordinance of secession, and at the same time annulled all military commissions previously issued above