Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Palmetto (Florida, United States) or search for Palmetto (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ing necessity. The corps was ordered back, on the 1st of September, to assist in bringing away the Quartermaster's and ordnance stores, and that night the city was evacuated. The retreat was in the direction of Lovejoy Station. The enemy followed, and on the 4th we fought them two miles north of that place, to such good purpose that on the 5th they returned to Atlanta. The battalion was parked in a field near the station, where it remained till the 18th of September; it then moved to Palmetto, and took position behind a line of fortifications extending from the railroad to the Chattahoochee river. Sketch of Dr. G. W. Derenne. ByCOLONEL C. C. Jones, Jr. [We have alluded in previous numbers to the splendid gift by Dr. DeRenne, of the bronze statue of a Confederate soldier to the Memorial Association of Savannah, and to the presentation to our Society of his beautiful Wormsloe Quartos, by Mrs. DeRenne. We are sure our readers will thank us for allowing them to see the follow
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
his time wounded, and Captain Rowan took command of the battalion, which left Lieutenant Ritter in command of the company. The battalion proceeded on the 27th to East Point, six miles southwest of Atlanta, whence it marched to Jonesboro, arriving there on the 30th and fighting the enemy on the same day. Atlanta's communications being cut on every side, its evacuation was now a pressing necessity. The corps was ordered back, on the 1st of September, to assist in bringing away the Quartermaster's and ordnance stores, and that night the city was evacuated. The retreat was in the direction of Lovejoy Station. The enemy followed, and on the 4th we fought them two miles north of that place, to such good purpose that on the 5th they returned to Atlanta. The battalion was parked in a field near the station, where it remained till the 18th of September; it then moved to Palmetto, and took position behind a line of fortifications extending from the railroad to the Chattahoochee river.