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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 183 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 80 36 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 22 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ackworth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Ackworth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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th the command were ordered there, and loaded by the twelfth, on the evening of which the whole corps evacuating Kingston had concentrated. The work of destroying the railroad from the Etowah River to Big Shanty was assigned to the Fourteenth corps, and early on the morning of the thirteenth it was commenced. The march, and complete destruction of the track, was accomplished by eleven (11) o'clock at night. The whole corps moved early the next morning from its camp in the vicinity of Ackworth and Big Shanty, and camped at the Chattahoochee River. On the morning of the fifteenth, the corps reached Atlanta, and bivouacked in the suburbs of the city. The remainder of the day and night was spent in issuing clothing to the men, filling up empty wagons with provisions, equalizing and assigning trains to the different commands, with a view to rapid marching. On the morning of the sixteenth, the head of the column marched on the road leading to Covington, through Decatur, and ma
t night. On the thirteenth, I resumed the march southward, and at Ackworth commenced destroying the railroad, which was continued to Big Shaned the march, and passing Kenesaw Mountain, leaving Big Shanty and Ackworth on the right, we crossed the Allatoona Mountain, the Etowah River,g morning I crossed the Etowah, marched through Allatoona Pass and Ackworth, destroyed two (2) miles of railroad, and camped my troops at Big ber thirteenth. October eighth, marched within a short distance of Ackworth, where we remained until the evening of the tenth, when we startedventh, and twelfth. November thirteenth, marched at daylight to Ackworth, thirteen miles, destroying the railroad from the Etowah River to in the direction of Dallas. October eighth, moved to a point near Ackworth, and remained in camp until five P. M., October tenth, when the diroyed the railroad from Allatoona Creek to a point one mile beyond Ackworth, and went into camp at Big Shanty. November fourteenth, division
e cavalry, and no positive information gained of the enemy, except the whereabouts and movement of their cavalry, and that Hood had crossed a part, if not all his force, over the Chattahoochee. I ascertained, on the second instant, that the enemy's cavalry had destroyed the railroad at or near Big Shanty, that Wheeler was at Villanow, and had sent a detachment to assault Dalton, which sent in a summons to surrender, but did not await to attack. Later in the day a train was captured near Acworth, and the road torn up three miles south of Allatoona, and on the following day, (October third,) General Sherman ordered me to suspend a movement I contemplated, stating that Hood was gradually developing his plans, which were of a very extensive character. At noon, on the fourth instant, they were sufficiently discovered to induce General Sherman to signal from Kenesaw (telegraph communication having been destroyed) that Hood was moving on Allatoona, thence to Rome. Large fires were dis