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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Clinton (Georgia, United States) or search for Clinton (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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might be destroyed. After pushing well in on Forsyth, and being convinced that the impression was made upon the enemy that our forces were moving directly on that point, I rapidly marched to Planters' Factory, crossed the Ocmulgee, and reached Clinton November nineteenth. Learning that a portion of Wheeler's cavalry had also crossed the river, and was now in my immediate front, I moved on the road to the city; forced back Wheeler's cavalry across Walnut Creek; charged and carried a portion othe enemy was driven by him beyond Griswold Station. The same day Colonel Atkins (Second brigade) had some severe fighting on the Macon and Milledgeville road, and effectually prevented any attack upon our trains, that were this day moving from Clinton to Gordon. November 24. My command marched to Milledgeville and crossed the Oconee. Having met the General-in-Chief the day previous at Milledgeville, and received instructions from him to move rapidly in direction of Millen, and, if poss
November 22. Wheeler advanced with his entire corps of cavalry and three (3) brigades of infantry, drove in my pickets and skirmish line, but was finally checked and driven back by the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry (Colonel Jordon) and Fifth Kentucky cavalry, (Colonel Baldwin,) the sabre being principally used. General Wolcott with his infantry now came up, and the enemy was driven by him beyond Griswold Station. The same day Colonel Atkins (Second brigade) had some severe fighting on the Macon and Milledgeville road, and effectually prevented any attack upon our trains, that were this day moving from Clinton to Gordon.
e hundred men of the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, at Clinton, with orders to take a road leading to Macon, to thon. On the twentieth, we moved toward Macon, (from Clinton.) Late in the evening we participated in a demonstrulgee on pontoon, and marched thirty miles, to Clinton, Georgia. 20th. Moved from Clinton at twelve M., myClinton at twelve M., my brigade in the advance. The Ninety-Second Illinois mounted infantry volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Van Buskirildings, and destroy the railroad. Starting from Clinton, he found the enemy picketing the roads. Avoiding the Ocmulgee and marched thirty-two (32) miles, to Clinton. This day's march killed ten (10) horses. On thgiment was ordered to make a sabre-charge along the Clinton and Macon road, and from which the enemy were then ng the Ocmulgee, passed through Hillsboro and on to Clinton; arrived at three P. M., and encamped. During the three captured. The remainder of the regiment left Clinton, and marched to within three (3) miles of Macon, an