Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Third Battery of Maryland Artillery, C. S. A. Its history in brief, and its commanders. (search)
on Deer Creek, Miss., and two guns to Fort DeRussa on Red river, which were put aboard the Queen of the West, after the capture of that vessel. Three guns, with the main body of the battery, were in the siege of Vicksburg, and at the capitulation, July 4, 1863, were surrendered. The battery was reorganized at Decatur, Ga., in October, 1863, and ordered to Sweet Water, Tenn., afterwards to Lookout Mountain, near Chattanooga. Was in the battle of Missionary Ridge and in the retreat to Dalton, Ga., November, 1863. Served under Generals Johnston and Hood in the Georgia campaign of 1864. Was with General Hood in his march to Nashville, Tenn., and his disastrous retreat to Columbus, Miss. February, 1865, ordered to Mobile, Ala., and afterwards to Meridian, Miss., where, under General R. Taylor, May 4, 1865, the battery was surrendered and the men paroled. The commanders during the war were: Captain Henry B. Latrobe, left service March 1, 1863; Captain Fred. O. Claiborne, killed a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
econd Presbyterian Church in Memphis, of which church she remained a member as long as she lived. She became an active worker in hospitals, and when nothing more could be done in Memphis she went through the lines and rendered substantial aid and comfort to the soldiers in the field. Her services, if fully recorded, would make a book. She was so recognized, that upon one occasion General Joseph E. Johnston had 30,000 of his bronzed and tattered soldiers to pass in review in her honor at Dalton. Such a distinction was, perhaps, never accorded to any other woman in the South—not even to Mrs. Jefferson Davis or to the wives of great generals. Yet, so earnest and sincere in her work was she that she commanded the respect and reverence of men wherever she was known. After the war she strove to comfort the vanquished and encourage the down-hearted, and continued in her way to do much good work. For a year or more past Mrs. Law has been unable to appear in public, though two years
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
al-Director, April 9, ‘64. Hd'qrs Army Tenn., Dalton, April 9, ‘64. Ordered to report to General H63, 8th and 19th Arkansas, headquarters A. T., Dalton, April 17, ‘64. bridges, James V., Surgeon, as Surgeon March 31, ‘64, headquarters A. T., Dalton, April 5, ‘64, April 30, 64, 32d Mississippi. s office, Feb. 12, ‘64, Headquarters A. T., Dalton, Ga., March 21, ‘64, ordered to report to Genera 4th Kentucky Regiment, Headquarters A. T., Dalton, Ga., Feb. 12, ‘64. April 30, ‘64, 4th Kentucky t to E. A. F., Medical-Director, Headquarters, Dalton. Jan. 20, ‘64, ordered to report to Major-Gen30, 63, 48th Tennessee, Headquarters A. T., Dalton, Ga., Jan. ‘64, transferred from command with Qu4, ‘62, to rank Aug. 22, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, Dalton, Ga., Aug. 26, ‘62, ordered to report to Major-G3, to rank from Oct. 22, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, Dalton, Ga. Relieved with S. H. Stout and ordered to reom'd Jan. 2, ‘62. Jan. 31, ‘63, Pest-House, Dalton, Ga., ordered to report to S. H. Stout, to Gen.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hospitals and Medical officers in charge, attached to the Army of Tennessee, July, 1864. (search)
Surgeon A. J. Foard, assigned to duty April, 1861, at Pensacola, Florida, as Medical-Director of Bragg's Command; March, 1862, assigned Medical-Director of Army at Corinth, Mississippi. Continued as Director of Army of Mississippi under General J. E. Johnston. Was assigned to command of Western Department in December, 1862, when he was made Medical-Director of Johnston's Command, embracing East Tennessee and Bragg's and Pemberton's Departments. Was ordered back to Army of Tennessee, at Dalton, January, 1864, when General J. E. Johnston took the command. June 30, 1864, Medical-Director of Army of Tennessee. Continued to act as such during Hood's Campaign; followed all the events of the closing disasters of the war, until the final surrender of the Confederate forces at Greensboro, N. C., May, 1865. Surgeon A. J. Foard was a gallant man, active, efficient and intelligent Medical-Director. He died shortly after the close of the Civil War in Charleston, S. C., after a brief soj
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
illiamsburg, and then, like Albert Sidney Johnston, at Shiloh, fell wounded, as he was pressing the enemy at Seven Pines, when opportunity vanished. For two years he was not again in battle; until 1864, when he took command of a defeated army at Dalton, and conducted a masterly retreat to Atlanta, fighting as he fell back at Dalton, Resaca, New Hope Church, and Kennesaw, and indeed, all along the way, with courage, skill, and effect. Unfortunately removed from the command, ere his plans matureDalton, Resaca, New Hope Church, and Kennesaw, and indeed, all along the way, with courage, skill, and effect. Unfortunately removed from the command, ere his plans matured, there was no chance to judge them by the event; and when he returned to a broken but undismayed army, and led it in its last gallant fight, at Bentonville, it was only the prelude of surrender. General Beauregard defended Charleston and Savannah with great gallantry and engineering skill, but he was engaged in but three great actions during the war—Manassas, in 1861; Shiloh, in 1862; and Petersburg, in 1864. He was victorious in the first, fortune failed him in the second, it perched agai