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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Eatonton (Georgia, United States) or search for Eatonton (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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o Savannah, with numerous breaks on the latter road from Gordon to Eatonton, and from Millen to Augusta, and the Savannah and Gulf Railroad. hat river, the other divisions moving direct to Milledgeville, via Eatonton, Geary's division rejoining the corps at Little River. The corps ing left in a condition to be of use again. At Rutledge, Madison, Eatonton, Milledgeville,Tennille, and Davisboro, machine-shops, turn-tables at daylight on the morning of the nineteenth, in the direction of Eatonton, by the way of Shady Dale, in the vicinity of which place the wholving Atlanta. On the twentieth, moved forward and encamped near Eatonton. The afternoon was rainy and the roads heavy. On the twenty-first, marched through Eatonton, encamping near Little River. Two or three miles of the Eatonton Branch Railroad were destroyed on the march. , Georgia militia; A. D. Taylor, Captain, Post Quartermaster, Eatonton, Georgia; Charles W. Baldwin, Captain, Cobb's Georgia Legion; S. McCom
ugh Madison, and encamped four miles beyond. About six miles of railroad were destroyed by Ward's division. Supplies for man and beast became abundant on the third day after leaving Atlanta. On the twentieth, moved forward and encamped near Eatonton. The afternoon was rainy and the roads heavy. On the twenty-first, marched through Eatonton, encamping near Little River. Two or three miles of the Eatonton Branch Railroad were destroyed on the march. On the twenty-second, having laid thEatonton, encamping near Little River. Two or three miles of the Eatonton Branch Railroad were destroyed on the march. On the twenty-second, having laid the pontoon-bridge over Little River, the corps crossed and moved forward to the suburbs of Milledgeville. Two regiments under Colonel Hawley, Third Wisconsin volunteers, (appointed commandant of the post,) were sent to occupy the town. The First and Second divisions were encamped on the east side of the Oconee, and the Third division on the west side, near the bridge. Large quantities of arms, ammunition, and accoutrements were found and destroyed, as well as salt and other public property. T
eight miles. November twentieth, moved toward Eatonton this morning at nine A. M., and encamped about five miles from Eatonton, after marching ten miles. This days's march was a very severe one, owingd. November twenty-second, marched through Eatonton, crossed Little River on pontoons, and campedery hard during the forenoon. Passed through Eatonton about eleven (11) A. M. Camped for the night miles south to Little River, passing through Eatonton. November 22.--Marched twelve miles to Milson, and marched in a southward course on the Eatonton road. At twelve M., it encamped three miles M., my command marched through the village of Eatonton. At nine P. M., the column having been tedioction, passing about six miles to the left of Eatonton. 22d. Marched at six A. M., the regiment g the railroad at Madison and passing through Eatonton, a point at the terminus of a branch of the rn-train, and camped about two miles north of Eatonton, at dark. 21st. Marched at five A. M., an[36 more...]
urday, Nov. 197 00 A. M.1 00 P. M.7 Beyond MadisonRainingA little muddyOne brigade, Second division sent to burn railroad bridge across Oconee, two brigades, Third division, detailed to tear up road. Sunday, Nov. 208 00 A. M.4 30 P. M.12 Toward EatontonCloudy, rained at 5 o'clockMuddyMen and animals now faring luxuriously. Monday, Nov. 217 00 A. M.12 M.13 5 miles beyond EatontonVery hard rainVery muddy and wornFrost at night. Captured Commander of Post, Colonel White, and Captain and AssistanEatontonVery hard rainVery muddy and wornFrost at night. Captured Commander of Post, Colonel White, and Captain and Assistant Quartermaster and Captain, Commissary of Subsistence. Tuesday, Nov. 227 30 A. M.5 00 P. M.15 MilledgevilleClear and very coldGoodCrossed Little River on pontoons; arrived at Milledgeville at twelve o'clock, and camped east side of Oconee River in woods. Wednesday, Nov. 23    In camp all dayClear and very cold Shoeing up and repairing. Burnt penitentiary, arsenal, destroyed arms, munitions of war, and railroad property. Thursday, Nov. 248 00 A. M.4 00 P. M.13 In the woodsFine and warmerG
Madison at one P. M. Camped four miles from Madison on the Milledgeville road at five P. M. Twentieth, rainy all night. First brigade rear-guard; passed through Eatonton at noon. Roads almost impassable. Camped at two A. M. Twenty-first, rain. Roads worse than yesterday. Camped at two A. M. Twenty-second, left camp at seven A.ed through Madison at two P. M.; taking the Milledgeville road at that place, we camped four miles from the town. Twentieth, marched at nine A. M., camping near Eatonton for the night. Twenty-first, marched at nine A. M. Passed through Eatonton. Camped at one A. M. Twenty-second, four miles from that place. Twenty-second, marcEatonton. Camped at one A. M. Twenty-second, four miles from that place. Twenty-second, marched at daylight. Crossed Little River. Reached Milledgeville at sunset. Went into camp about one mile east of the town. Twenty-third, was ordered out in light marching order at one P. M. Marched to the Milledgeville and Eatonton Railroad. We were engaged in destroying that road until after dark, when we returned to camp. Twen
f miles of Oconee River, on Georgia Railroad, tore up track afternoon and evening. 20th. Moved at seven A. M. toward Eatonton, passing Park's Bridge and Slade's Cross-Roads. Camped near Dunning's tannery, at six P. M. 21st. Moved at six A. M., toward Eatonton. 22d. Struck Eatonton Branch Railroad, and passing through Milledgeville and over the Oconee River, camped two miles beyond it. 23d. In camp. 24th. Moved at ten A. M., on road to Hebron. 25th. Passed through Hebron.he rear of the Fourteenth corps. It moved on the line of the Augusta Railroad as far as Covington, thence south through Eatonton to Milledgeville, reaching the latter place November twenty-third. At this point the regiment joined the brigade, and h was either destroyed or appropriated; among the rest, the noted and extensive Dunham tannery and shoe manufactory, near Eatonton, in which duty the regiment participated. On the twenty-third, the command was engaged and assisted in destroying the r