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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Irwinton (Georgia, United States) or search for Irwinton (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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ce with his leading division. The right column was subdivided; two divisions, with small trains, taking the road toward Irwinton, and the rest, with headquarters, bridge-train, cattle, etc., moving on the direct Gordon road. The centre and left colus were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was directed to take up a strong position on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction wion-train through. General Woods's division is moving up this way, abreast of General Corse; General Hazen moving toward Irwinton General Blair moving along the railroad, and destroying it. I propose, with your sanction, to move across the Oconee pecial Field Or der, dated November twenty-third, my command marched from Gordon in two columns, the Fifteenth corps via Irwinton to Ball's Ferry,the Seventeenth corps along the railroad with instructions to cross at Jackson Ferry, two and a half mil
November 21, 1864. The cavalry took up an advance position covering all roads debouching from Macon. General Blair continued his march direct on Gordon, reaching that place with his leading division. The right column was subdivided; two divisions, with small trains, taking the road toward Irwinton, and the rest, with headquarters, bridge-train, cattle, etc., moving on the direct Gordon road. The centre and left column met at a point, six miles from Gordon, called Pitt's Mill, where the centre made a parallel road into Gordon. Only the division of General G. A. Smith, however, reached Gordon on the twenty-first.
November 22, 1864. The troops and trains were closed up toward Gordon, excepting General Woods's division, who was directed to take up a strong position on the Irwinton road, and make a demonstration toward Macon. The demonstration was made by General Walcott's brigade, in conjunction with the cavalry on the different roads. The rebel cavalry, in force, made a charge early in the morning, capturing one of our cavalry picket-posts, estimated forty-five men killed, wounded, and missing. Quite a little action grew out of it, in which there was charging and counter-charging of cavalry, when, finally, the enemy were driven from the field in confusion, Walcott's infantry, skirmishing, lending a hand. In the afternoon, Walcott had taken up a position, two miles in advance of his division, to-ward Macon, having two pieces of artillery, and had thrown up rail barricades, when he was attacked by quite a large body of infantry, accompanied by some artillery-probably a battery of four
November 23, 1864. The Fourth division, Fifteenth corps, with bridge-train, having roads that were almost impassable, only reached the vicinity of Clinton at night. This morning, fifty-five to fifty-six mule-teams have been sent to assist the pontoon-train through. General Woods's division is moving up this way, abreast of General Corse; General Hazen moving toward Irwinton General Blair moving along the railroad, and destroying it. I propose, with your sanction, to move across the Oconee River at two points; one, six miles below the railroad bridge at Ball's Ferry; the other, two and a half miles above the railroad bridge at Jackson's Ferry. I have already forwarded to you despatches captured. Prisoners still estimate the strength of the enemy in our vicinity about ten thousand. The attack on Walcott was made, I think, by militia, mingled with some old troops retained at Macon. The number of prisoners of war in my hands: In the Seventeenth corps, thirty-five enlisted men
h Ohio. The troops moved rapidly, passing through McDonough the seventeenth, Indian Springs the eighteenth, crossing the Ocmulgee the nineteenth, at Roach's Mills, reaching Hillsboro the twentieth, and Clinton the twenty-first, where Colonel Theodore Jones's brigade was left to cover the Macon roads till the next division arrived. Some skirmishing took place here, with a few casualties. On the twenty-second, the Macon and Augusta Railroad was crossed, and the march continued, passing Irwinton the twenty-fourth, and the Oconee River, at Bull's Ferry, the twenty-fifth. The enemy was found on the opposite bank, and two regiments deployed to develop them. On the morning of the twenty-sixth, they had left, and preparations were at once made to cross, which was commenced by eleven A. M. The march was resumed without loss of time; passing Irwin's Cross-Roads the twenty-seventh, we moved toward Sunmmertown, through continuous pine forests, crossing several low marshy branches of th