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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 693 51 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 610 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 83 39 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 70 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) or search for Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ut was about this time wounded, and Captain Rowan took command of the battalion, which left Lieutenant Ritter in command of the company. The battalion proceeded on the 27th to East Point, six miles southwest of Atlanta, whence it marched to Jonesboro, arriving there on the 30th and fighting the enemy on the same day. Atlanta's communications being cut on every side, its evacuation was now a pressing necessity. The corps was ordered back, on the 1st of September, to assist in bringing awayshop, General Leonidas Polk. And then in the east began the siege of Petersburg With scream of shot and burst of shell And bellowing of the mortars. In the west battles followed in quick succession. Peach Tree creek, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Mill Creek gap, Columbia, Franklin, second Murfreesboro, Nashville, and Spanish Fort in Mobile bay, Alabama. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, in our trenches, We lay along the battery's side, Below the smoking cannon, But— The enemy's mines
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
guns, detailing men to work them from Rowan's and Corput's batteries. Several attempts made by the enemy to plant batteries in our front, were frustrated by aid of these guns. They were removed, August 20th, to the south of the city. Captain Corput was about this time wounded, and Captain Rowan took command of the battalion, which left Lieutenant Ritter in command of the company. The battalion proceeded on the 27th to East Point, six miles southwest of Atlanta, whence it marched to Jonesboro, arriving there on the 30th and fighting the enemy on the same day. Atlanta's communications being cut on every side, its evacuation was now a pressing necessity. The corps was ordered back, on the 1st of September, to assist in bringing away the Quartermaster's and ordnance stores, and that night the city was evacuated. The retreat was in the direction of Lovejoy Station. The enemy followed, and on the 4th we fought them two miles north of that place, to such good purpose that on th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
e day, and with his army badly beaten, old Ben Butler was bottled. In the west the guns of the Fifth Company were engaged at Cassville, Dallas, New Hope Church, Pine Mountain aad Kennesaw mountain. At the latter place fell Louisiana's lamented Bishop, General Leonidas Polk. And then in the east began the siege of Petersburg With scream of shot and burst of shell And bellowing of the mortars. In the west battles followed in quick succession. Peach Tree creek, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Mill Creek gap, Columbia, Franklin, second Murfreesboro, Nashville, and Spanish Fort in Mobile bay, Alabama. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, in our trenches, We lay along the battery's side, Below the smoking cannon, But— The enemy's mines had crept surely in, And the end was coming fast. It was smoke and roar and powder stench, And weary waiting for death. So the men plied their hopeless war And knew that the end was near. April 2, the lines were broken. By a singular coincidenc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
e sentinel, they left the house, accompanied by the lady, who showed them a by-path over the mountain, and, after going several miles, returned. To this lady they were indebted for their escape, and had it not been for her stratagem they would have been marched back that night as prisoners. They first went to Mr. Fleenor's residence, where they were joyfully received, for the family had thought of them as dead, believing they would be murdered by their captors. From there they went to Jonesboro, where they informed the authorities of what had taken place, and furnished a complete list of the names of the bushwhackers. A company of cavalry was sent to capture the gang, Lieutenant Doncaster acting as guide. They experienced considerable difficulty in finding Burlesson, but at last Lieutenant Doncaster, believing that he was on the premises of a certain individual, where he was known to visit, threatened one of the servants considerably if he did not tell where he was concealed.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The twenty-fourth South Carolina at the battle of Jonesboro. (search)
uth Carolina at the battle of Jonesboro. Official report of Colonel Ellison Capers. headquarters twenty-Fourth regiment,) South Carolina Volunteers, Jonesboro, Ga., September 12th, 1864. To Major B. B. Smith, A. A. G., Gist's Brigade: Major,—I submit herewith a report of the part borne by my regiment in front of JonesJonesboro on the afternoon of the 1st instant. The brigade having been ordered from the left of the corps at I o'clock P. M. to the extreme right, was placed in position by the Lieutenant-General, in person, on the right, and east of the railroad. The left rested on the railroad cut, which, at that point, was some eight or ten feet rched out from our position, and in advance of the brigade reached Lovejoy by daylight and went to work at once on the new line formed there. In the action at Jonesboro the regiment sustained an irreparable loss in the death of Major D. F. Hill. He fell while endeavoring to arrest the retirement of the sharp-shooters on my left