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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
s a cabin twelve by sixteeen feet, with a fireplace and chimney, window and door. After their long campaigning, this was a delightful change. On the 20th of January, 1864, the whole battalion, for easier access to long forage, was ordered to Kingston, where it again built winter quarters. Between the 1st and 10th of January sixty men were received from the State of Georgia, and the battery was shortly afterwards joined by fifteen volunteer recruits. This accession necessitated drill, whichm which were borne Simmons and Stuart, and in that pen where Russell fell and found a grave beneath the cannon's trail, the Fifth Company never showed more coolness, more valor, nor more fortitude. In quick succession came Calhoon, Adairsville, Kingston and Cassville's lost opportunity. The Etowah is crossed, Dalton and New Hope Church claim more precious lives. 'Tis McGregor, 'tis Winston, 'tis Billy Sewell, with his last breath whispering into Slocomb's ear: Captain, haven't I done my duty?
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ers for the winter, and during all the early part of December the men were engaged in building houses for themselves and stables for the horses. The officers, Captain Rowan, Lieutenants Ritter, Giles and Doucaster, and Surgeon Rogers built themselves a cabin twelve by sixteeen feet, with a fireplace and chimney, window and door. After their long campaigning, this was a delightful change. On the 20th of January, 1864, the whole battalion, for easier access to long forage, was ordered to Kingston, where it again built winter quarters. Between the 1st and 10th of January sixty men were received from the State of Georgia, and the battery was shortly afterwards joined by fifteen volunteer recruits. This accession necessitated drill, which was had twice a day. The camp here was in a wood near Hightower Creek, a beautiful stream emptying into Etowah river The Third Maryland was, on the 23d of March, ordered to Dalton to rejoin the battalion which had been sent thither, to aid in rep
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
the bridge. Joe Johnston comes, and Dalton's cantonments ring with joy. With spring, Sherman attempts the portals of the pass, and Rocky-face and Buzzard's Roost repell him to Snake Gap. Resaca finds us in the thickest fray, and on that hill from which were borne Simmons and Stuart, and in that pen where Russell fell and found a grave beneath the cannon's trail, the Fifth Company never showed more coolness, more valor, nor more fortitude. In quick succession came Calhoon, Adairsville, Kingston and Cassville's lost opportunity. The Etowah is crossed, Dalton and New Hope Church claim more precious lives. 'Tis McGregor, 'tis Winston, 'tis Billy Sewell, with his last breath whispering into Slocomb's ear: Captain, haven't I done my duty? Can Pine Mountain and Kennesaw Ridge ever be forgotten? those long days of constant fighting, those nights of sleepless vigilance and recurring labor, those works uncarried, where Barrail fell and Staub received his death wound. For once, sinc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
hat department was defective in consequence of the appointment of incompetent officers and assistants. Men who were afraid to expose their hides to the enemy's bullets obtained through favoritism lucrative positions in the department of subsistence, hence the disastrous consequences. That the reader may comprehend some of the difficulties that beset the artillery branch of the service, I copy the following communications of Captain John B. Rowan: Headquarters Rowan's battery, near Kingston, Ga., Jan'y 28, 1864. Major,—On my return from furlough I found the stock of my battery affected with some fatal disease, fourteen horses having died within the three weeks of my absence and two to-day. Two more will die to-day or to-morrow at farthest, and several more are afflicted in a similar manner to those which have died. The disease with which my stock have died seems to be an epidemic catarrh; known to be fatal unless the proper remedies are employed to check it, which remedi