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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for McDonough (Georgia, United States) or search for McDonough (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 6 document sections:

rtment headquarter train, and the herds of cattle. This column moved via Rough and Ready, turning to the left toward McDonough, about five miles from Jonesboro. Upon the evening of the fifteenth, the command went into camp; Kilpatrick near Jonbrigade of rebel cavalry, reported nine hundred strong. November 16, 1864. The command marched to the vicinity of McDonough by three routes. General Osterhaus met the enemy's cavalry at the crossing of Cotton River. They retreated rapidly, se enemy beyond Bear Station, capturing over fifty prisoners. He then moved to the left, and encamped on the Griffin and McDonough road. November 17, 1864. Moved to Jackson and its vicinity in three columns, encamping the right near Indian Spriroached the city, and opened with artillery from positions a little south of Decatur road, and from elevations down the McDonough road. Along the latter road, they undertook, with dismounted men, an assault on the lines of Geary's division, probabl
November 16, 1864. The command marched to the vicinity of McDonough by three routes. General Osterhaus met the enemy's cavalry at the crossing of Cotton River. They retreated rapidly, setting fire to the bridge. Some mounted infantry that he had in advance drove them from the bridge in time to put out the fire, and save every thing but the planking. The bridge was immediately repaired, and detained the column just forty minutes. General Kilpatrick crossed the Flint River at the bridlowed him to Lovejoy, where he occupied the strong position there, having two brigades of cavalry and two pieces of artillery, and holding the old rebel works. The General charged the works with dismounted cavalry, and carried them, driving back the enemy. Subsequently, the enemy's. artillery was overtaken by another charging column, and captured. He drove the enemy beyond Bear Station, capturing over fifty prisoners. He then moved to the left, and encamped on the Griffin and McDonough road.
my corps, broke camp, and moved out upon the McDonough road, and encamped for the night. It return. November 5.--Marched three miles on the McDonough road, in a south-easterly direction, and encp about two hundred (200) yards north of the McDonough road, and south-west of Atlanta nearly threen, and encamped for the night on or near the McDonough road. On the following day, orders were recat the large fort about a half-mile from the McDonough road, and covered this front during the entiamp and marched with the division out on the McDonough road about two miles and bivouacked. 6th.ocum, the division moved out of town, on the McDonough road; but was ordered to its old camp the neday of November the brigade moved out on the McDonough road for the distance of two miles and then in guarding their front, extending from the McDonough road on the right, and connecting with the ph the balance of the corps, two miles on the McDonough road, where it remained until noon of the ne[4 more...]
uring the afternoon I crossed the river with one battalion of my regiment, having been ordered to open communication with Colonel Jones, who crossed the river above me. Pushing on toward the town, my advance came upon a column moving out on the McDonough road. Lieutenant Baker, with company E, immediately charged the enemy, and drove them hastily through the town. In the mean time, another regiment of the enemy had taken position in rear of the town with artillery, sweeping the road before thht. November 15.--Left camp and moved to within five (5) miles of Jonesboro. Third battalion being in advance, drove in the enemy's pickets. 16th. Passing through Jonesboro. Lovejoy, and Bear Creek Station, moved three (3) miles on the McDonough road, and encamped for the night. 17th. Left camp and marched about twenty-two (22) miles, and encamped for the night. 18th. Marched fifteen (15) miles. 19th. Crossing the Ocmulgee, passed through Hillsboro and on to Clinton; arrive
composed of seventeen regimental organizations. Its three brigade commanders being, Colonels John M. Oliver, Fifteenth Michigan; Wells S. Jones, Fifty-third Ohio; and Theodore Jones, Thirtieth Ohio. The troops moved rapidly, passing through McDonough the seventeenth, Indian Springs the eighteenth, crossing the Ocmulgee the nineteenth, at Roach's Mills, reaching Hillsboro the twentieth, and Clinton the twenty-first, where Colonel Theodore Jones's brigade was left to cover the Macon roads tiland; arrived in camp October twenty-sixth at four P. M. Brought in some eight hundred wagons loaded with corn. October twenty-eighth, 1864, moved out to Decatur to support a forage party, returned the same night. November fifth, moved out the McDonough road three miles, camped for the night. Some little picket-firing took place during the night. Returned to our old camp on the sixth. November eleventh, an election was held in the regiment; two hundred and forty-three votes were polled for A
ted with the brigade, and marched a little over a mile out of the city on the McDonough road, and encamped for the night, and on the morning of the sixth, marched baning of September second, and was posted, September third, on the left of the McDonough road, removing to the right of the road on the fifth, when the regiment went strike tents and prepare for marching. Marching about three miles out on the McDonough road, we halted and remained until the day following, (November sixth,) when ty of Atlanta, the regiment was assigned a permanent camp to the right of the McDonough road, about one and one half miles from the court-house. In this camp it rem broken, and the regiment moved with the brigade at three P. M., out upon the McDonough road, camping two and one half miles from the city. On the sixth of Novembert broke camp at three P. M., and, with brigade and division, moved out on the McDonough road, and bivouacked till 6th. The order to march having been countermand