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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 122 4 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 8, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Madison, Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Madison, Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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and Stone Mountain, with orders to tear up the railroad from Social Circle to Madison, to burn the large and important railroad-bridge across the Oconee, east of Madison, and turn south and reach Milledgeville on the seventh day, exclusive of the day of march. In person I left Atlanta on the sixteenth, in company with the Fourtee of Stone Mountain; on the evening of the sixteenth, near Rock Bridge Post-Office; on the seventeenth, near Cornish Creek; on the eighteenth, three miles west of Madison. The country for the first three days march was very hilly, and the crossing at Yellow River, Little Haynes River, and other streams, very bad. The condition of rned. The division rejoined the column on the twenty-first, before reaching Little River. The other two divisions, with the trains of the corps, moved through Madison, and encamped four miles beyond. About six miles of railroad were destroyed by Ward's division. Supplies for man and beast became abundant on the third day afte
t through Decatur. We encamped on the fifteenth near the Georgia Railroad, south of Stone Mountain; on the evening of the sixteenth, near Rock Bridge Post-Office; on the seventeenth, near Cornish Creek; on the eighteenth, three miles west of Madison. The country for the first three days march was very hilly, and the crossing at Yellow River, Little Haynes River, and other streams, very bad. The condition of the teams was not good, and delays to the rear of our long column were consequentlyroyed. A wagon-bridge over that river and several mills and factories were also burned. The division rejoined the column on the twenty-first, before reaching Little River. The other two divisions, with the trains of the corps, moved through Madison, and encamped four miles beyond. About six miles of railroad were destroyed by Ward's division. Supplies for man and beast became abundant on the third day after leaving Atlanta. On the twentieth, moved forward and encamped near Eatonton.
Helped sixty wagons through. Passed through Madison; made nine miles, and got into camp at three twelve M., it encamped three miles south of Madison. The aggregate distance marched on this and l Circle about noon, and proceeding nearly to Madison, making in all about fifteen miles. On the ning the line of the Augusta Railroad as far as Madison, where we turned southward and struck the Milally accomplished. This night we camped near Madison, having marched about eighteen (18) miles. o tear up railroad track, went into camp near Madison at five P. M. 19th. Broke camp at five A. 19th. Marched at five A. M.; passed through Madison at daybreak, followed the line of the railroaabout a mile of railroad, with side-track, at Madison; also some railroad buildings, and a hundred stroying the railroad at Social Circle and at Madison. My command subsisted for thirty days almostlroad track. On the following day arrived at Madison, where it destroyed about ten rods of track, [37 more...]
ain Gary and two men of battery C, First Ohio artillery, were captured on the twelfth instant on Hutchinson's Island, where they had gone to seek forage. One enlisted man of battery E, Pennsylvania artillery, died of disease on the march near Madison. The admirable policy of having (8) eight horses on a carriage for a long march over bad roads was clearly demonstrated on this campaign. The batteries subsisted mainly on the country during the march, securing principally their own supplind other expeditions from Atlanta, we received in all about seven thousand (7000) pounds corn for the animals of the battery. We moved from Atlanta November fifteenth, taking the Augusta road. One man died of disease, November eighteenth, near Madison. From this date until arriving in front of Savannah, December tenth, nothing worthy of note in a report transpired. December thirteenth, nineteen rounds of ammunition were expended, mostly thrown into the city. Twenty rounds were fired on the
llyCommencing to find subsistence for men and forage for animals. Thursday, Nov. 177 30 A. M.6 30 P. M.16 UnknownFineGood, hillyCommenced killing worthless animals; bad place two miles back from camp, over which First division could not pass to-night. Friday, Nov. 187 30 A. M.7 30 P. M.15 Jones's FarmFine in day, rained at nightGood, hillyPassed through Social Circle and Rutledge, destroying railroad depots, tanks, wood, and track thoroughly. Saturday, Nov. 197 00 A. M.1 00 P. M.7 Beyond MadisonRainingA little muddyOne brigade, Second division sent to burn railroad bridge across Oconee, two brigades, Third division, detailed to tear up road. Sunday, Nov. 208 00 A. M.4 30 P. M.12 Toward EatontonCloudy, rained at 5 o'clockMuddyMen and animals now faring luxuriously. Monday, Nov. 217 00 A. M.12 M.13 5 miles beyond EatontonVery hard rainVery muddy and wornFrost at night. Captured Commander of Post, Colonel White, and Captain and Assistant Quartermaster and Captain, Commissary of Sub
Eighteenth, rear-guard; left camp at half-past 7 A. M. Passed though Social Circle at noon, crossed the river, camped five miles from Rutledge at two P. M. Nineteenth, left camp at six A. M. Train-guard. Raining. Weather warm. Passed through Madison at one P. M. Camped four miles from Madison on the Milledgeville road at five P. M. Twentieth, rainy all night. First brigade rear-guard; passed through Eatonton at noon. Roads almost impassable. Camped at two A. M. Twenty-first, rain. Roads 12 P. M. Eighteenth, marched at nine A. M. Halted at Social Circle, at two P. M., for dinner. Afternoon, resumed the march, passing through Rutledge, and encamped at eleven P. M. Nineteenth, marched at nine A. M. On train-guard. Passed through Madison at two P. M.; taking the Milledgeville road at that place, we camped four miles from the town. Twentieth, marched at nine A. M., camping near Eatonton for the night. Twenty-first, marched at nine A. M. Passed through Eatonton. Camped at one A
at half-past 7 A. M., halting in the village of Rutledge for dinner. Encamped within a mile of Madison at half-past 6 P. M., having marched about eighteen (18) miles. Saturday, November nineteenth, left camp at five A. M.; marched through Madison at daybreak in a moderate rain, which ceased about seven o'clock. Halted near Buckhead for dinner. At four P. M., encamped for the night. After sped at half-past 5 P. M., one mile from Madison. 19th. Moved at five A. M., passing through Madison. Halted for dinner at Buckhead Station, and continuing the march to within one and one half mi 17th. On the march. 18th. Left camp at half-past 7 A. M., and encamped at night near Madison, Georgia. 19th. Passed through Madison, Georgia, at daylight; regiment in advance of the divisioMadison, Georgia, at daylight; regiment in advance of the division, destroying railroad. 20th. On the march, destroying railroad at night, and encamped. 21st. On the march. 22d. On the march. Reached Milledgeville, Georgia, at six P. M. 23d. Lay in
fair the brigade lost three wounded, one mortally. The brigade remained in bivouac, at different places in the lower valley, until Saturday, the twenty-second November, when they moved, with the light division, from Jordan's Spring, on the Opequon, near Winchester. Marching up the Winchester and Staunton turnpike, we turned to the left at New Market, passed the Blue Ridge at Milam's Gap, then covered with snow, and on the twenty-seventh left the beautiful valley of Virginia. Passing by Madison and Orange, we reached the Massaponax Hill, near Fredericksburg, on Wednesday, the third of December, having made a march of one hundred and seventy-five miles in twelve days. Again regretting much the many imperfections of this hasty sketch of operations which must be historical, I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. Mcgowan, Brigadier-General, commanding Second Brigade L. D. Statement of Killed and Wounded.  Killed.Wounded.Aggregate. Orr's R