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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 570 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 328 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 124 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 116 60 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 89 3 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 84 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 80 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 74 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 66 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Resaca (Georgia, United States) or search for Resaca (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
long the whole line. The battle at Resaca. On the night of the 12th the corps fell back to Resaca. Two days later the battery took position on the front, two miles from Resaca, to the left of tResaca, to the left of the Dalton road, and about a hundred yards to the right of an obtuse angle in the line, which was occupied by Dent's Alabama battery. The latter held the summit of a ridge, the prolongation of which, alks to prevent a noise as the carriages passed over. The casualties of the Third Maryland at Resaca, were three killed and fifteen wounded: Killed: Corporal B. Sanchez, privates Henry Steward, gerous a post was held by the Third Maryland in the battle of Resaca: Field hospital, near Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864. Captain M. Van Den Corput: Captain,—I regret exceedingly that an unfortunatn attempts the portals of the pass, and Rocky-face and Buzzard's Roost repell him to Snake Gap. Resaca finds us in the thickest fray, and on that hill from which were borne Simmons and Stuart, and in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
was only picket-firing along the whole line. The battle at Resaca. On the night of the 12th the corps fell back to Resaca. Two days later the battery took position on the front, two miles from Resaca, to the left of the Dalton road, and aboutResaca, to the left of the Dalton road, and about a hundred yards to the right of an obtuse angle in the line, which was occupied by Dent's Alabama battery. The latter held the summit of a ridge, the prolongation of which, in front, it was expected to command, while Captain Rowan was directed to covered with green corn stalks to prevent a noise as the carriages passed over. The casualties of the Third Maryland at Resaca, were three killed and fifteen wounded: Killed: Corporal B. Sanchez, privates Henry Steward, and a third whose name isows how difficult and dangerous a post was held by the Third Maryland in the battle of Resaca: Field hospital, near Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864. Captain M. Van Den Corput: Captain,—I regret exceedingly that an unfortunate wound prevents me from
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
Blair, Vaught now stands promoted, and Chickamauga's victory led us but to Missionary Ridge. Dissensions and rivalries have brought defeat. The Fifth, unmoved, indignant and devoted, their battery sacrificed, seized the first guns abandoned in their rear, and with Austin's help check the enemy and save the bridge. Joe Johnston comes, and Dalton's cantonments ring with joy. With spring, Sherman attempts the portals of the pass, and Rocky-face and Buzzard's Roost repell him to Snake Gap. Resaca finds us in the thickest fray, and on that hill from which were borne Simmons and Stuart, and in that pen where Russell fell and found a grave beneath the cannon's trail, the Fifth Company never showed more coolness, more valor, nor more fortitude. In quick succession came Calhoon, Adairsville, Kingston and Cassville's lost opportunity. The Etowah is crossed, Dalton and New Hope Church claim more precious lives. 'Tis McGregor, 'tis Winston, 'tis Billy Sewell, with his last breath whisperi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
way of Dallas, Van Wert and Cave Spring, the army next reached Cedartown, where the wagon train, the sick and the shoeless, with all the artillery except one battery of each battalion were left behind; while the remainder of the army proceeded to Resaca and Dalton. Stevenson's division started on the 9th of October, at noon, and the Third Maryland was the battery chosen to accompany it. It was the intention of General Stephen D. Lee, who commanded the corps, to capture the garrison at ResacaResaca, and he made forced marches in order to take it by surprise. On the 12th it was surrounded by approaches made from the north, and its unconditional surrender demanded. The Major in command of the post refused to yield, however, and General Lee did not think it worth while to compel him, and proceeded on his way. On the 14th he passed through Snake Creek Gap to Villenow, where he joined the two other corps. The latter under Stewart and Cheatham, had been sent to Tilton and Dalton to capture