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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 570 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 328 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 124 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 116 60 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 89 3 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 84 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 80 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 74 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 66 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Resaca (Georgia, United States) or search for Resaca (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
o ended the siege of Vicksburg. With the long march to Enterprise, the exchange of the troops, their fortunes in the last years of the war, this paper cannot deal. The Botetourt Artillery —all that was left of it—was exchanged at Enterprise. Ragged, worn and cheerful, it marched away to old Virginia. Its Captain, John William Johnston, becoming Major of Artillery, left the company. Through the remainder of the war he commanded Johnston's Battery of light artillery. He fought at Dalton, Resaca, Columbia, Franklin and Nashville, and surrendered at Salisbury, N. C., two days after the surrender of his kinsman, Joseph E. Johnston. He was a soldier all his life, and a much loved man. In this paper I have more than once quoted Gunner No. 4, Adam H. Plecker, who lives now at Lynchburg, in Virginia. Gunner No. 4 has this to say of his old captain: I have two pictures in my mind. When we camped at Manassas orders were issued for all the men who wished to do so to assemble just before t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Federal Atrocities in the Civil war. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August 10, 1902. (search)
ll; and General Sherman knew, for he certainly endeavored to make it so. On October 29, 1864, General Sherman issued the following official order, viz.: headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the field, Rome, Ga., October 29, 1864. Brigadier-General Watkins, Caloun, Ga.,—Cannot you send over about Fairmount and Adairsville, burn ten or twelve houses of known secessionists, kill a few at random and let them know that it will be repeated every time a train is fired on from Resaca to Kingston? W. T. Sherman, Major-General Commanding. That order is printed in the war record, serial volumn No. 79, page 494, and each of the instances hereinafter mentioned are likewise not legends, but taken from the same official publication. On October 19, 1864, he wrote to General James H. Wilson from Summerville, Ga.: I am going into the very bowels of the Confederacy, and propose to leave a trail that will be recognized fifty years hence. To Colonel A. Beckwith he wrote of