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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
on our rear by the two roads to Lafayette and Ringgold. Two other corps were now in Wills's valley,tenden moved from Chattanooga on the roads to Ringgold and Lee and Gordon's mills. To strike these o be divided—one division having been sent to Ringgold. Upon learning the dispositions of the enemyral B. R. Johnston, whose brigade had been at Ringgold holding the railroad, was moved towards Reed'ams, etc., not with troops, should go towards Ringgold and Dalton, Georgia, beyond Taylor's ridge. eutenant-General Longstreet of his arrival at Ringgold and departure for the field. Five small brigbeen destroyed to a point two miles south of Ringgold. These supplies were ordered to be replenish, too, had been destroyed to a point south of Ringgold, and in all the road from Cleveland to Knoxviseverance, all difficulties were overcome. Ringgold was reached on the night of the 25th, and ther struggle. The enemy made pursuit as far as Ringgold, but was so handsomely checked by Major-Gener[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
and at Chickamauga Station, took the route by Ringgold. A small cavalry force was left in observatiy, strongly supported by cavalry, was left at Ringgold to hold the railroad and protect it from raidon our rear by the two roads to Lafayette and Ringgold. Two other corps were now in Wills's valley,tenden moved from Chattanooga on the roads to Ringgold and Lee and Gordon's mills. To strike these o be divided—one division having been sent to Ringgold. Upon learning the dispositions of the enemyral B. R. Johnston, whose brigade had been at Ringgold holding the railroad, was moved towards Reed'ams, etc., not with troops, should go towards Ringgold and Dalton, Georgia, beyond Taylor's ridge. eutenant-General Longstreet of his arrival at Ringgold and departure for the field. Five small brigbeen destroyed to a point two miles south of Ringgold. These supplies were ordered to be replenish, too, had been destroyed to a point south of Ringgold, and in all the road from Cleveland to Knoxvi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ply, Lieutenant Ritter told the man to take his horse and ride, and that he himself, though no expert in the art, would drive the mules. The infantry rear-guard was at this time passing by, and told Ritter that he had better abandon his forge; that the enemy was coming up, and he would certainly be captured, as he would be between the lines. Being bent on succeeding in the task he had assigned himself, he mounted his team, and by a little perseverance, all difficulties were overcome. Ringgold was reached on the night of the 25th, and the next day at 5 P. M., the battery encamped near Dalton. General Bragg was here superseded in the command of the army by General Joseph E. Johnston. In winter quarters. The command proceeded to Sugar Valley on the 27th of November, to go into quarters for the winter, and during all the early part of December the men were engaged in building houses for themselves and stables for the horses. The officers, Captain Rowan, Lieutenants Ritter,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
Battle of Chickamauga. Report of Lieutenant-General Longstreet. headquarters near Chattanooga, October, 1862. Colonel George Wm. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel,—Our train reached Catoosa platform, near Ringgold, about 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th of September. As soon as our horses came up, about 4 o'clock, I started with Colonel Sorrel and Colonel Manning, of my staff, to find the headquarters of the Commanding General. We missed our way, and did not report as follows: Stewart's, Johnson's, Hindman's and Preston's divisions. Hood's division (of which only three brigades were up) was somewhat in the rear of Johnson's, Kershaw's and Humphrey's brigades, McLaws's division, were ordered forward from Ringgold the night before, but were not up yet. General McLaws's had not arrived from Richmond. I set to work to have the line adjusted by closing to the right, in order to occupy some vacant ground between the two wings, and to make room for Hood in t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
ch first fled and brought this great disaster and disgrace upon our arms; an investigation will bring out the truth, however, and full justice shall be done to the good and the bad. After arriving at Chickamauga and informing myself of the full condition of affairs, it was decided to put the army in motion for a point farther removed from a powerful and victorious army, that we might have some little time to replenish and recuperate for another struggle. The enemy made pursuit as far as Ringgold, but was so handsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance. Our losses are not yet ascertained, but in killed and wounded it is known to be very small. In stragglers and prisoners, I fear it is much larger. The Chief of Artillery reports the loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter o