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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 189 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 25 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Sandersville (Georgia, United States) or search for Sandersville (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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gress, as far as Tennille Station, opposite Sandersville, and General Slocum to move to SandersvilleSandersville by two roads. General Kilpatrick was ordered to Milledgeville and thence move rapidly eastward, tod the Twentieth corps from Milledgeville to Sandersville, approaching which place on the twenty-fiftyed us three hours. The next day we entered Sandersville, skirmishing with Wheeler's cavalry, which near Riddleville ; the left abreast on the Sandersville and Savannah road; and the right, consistinboth corps moved from near Milledgeville to Sandersville — the Fourteenth via Black Spring, and the the bridge, preparatory to the advance upon Sandersville. This place was reached on the twenty-sixt the column encamped about seven miles from Sandersville. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry on the flanks. The troops entered Sandersville simultaneously with Fourteenth corps; skirmn, No. 13. Third division covered trains at Sandersville.--Weather : Clear.--Road : Excellent.--Supp[5 more...]
m Creek; and on the twenty-fifth, after some delay, to rebuild the bridges over Buffalo Creek and Swamp, the head of the column encamped about seven miles from Sandersville. Some skirmishing was had, and the enemy's cavalry was driven away by Colonel Robinson's brigade just as we were going into camp. On the following morning, (twenty-sixth,) two regiments of Carman's brigade, Jackson's division, drove away the rebel cavalry, and the corps moved rapidly into Sandersville, entering simultaneously with the Fourteenth corps, upon a road on our left. In the afternoon, the First and Second divisions were moved down to Tennille Station, (No 13,) the Third dins and presses. No large accumulations were found except at Milledgeville, reported one thousand eight hundred bales bonded by order of General Sherman; near Sandersville, where — about one hundred bales were destroyed; at Lee Gordon's plantation, two hundred and eighty bales destroyed by General Geary; and at Tennille Station,
November 26. Order of march; First, Second, and Third divisions; cavalry on the flanks. The troops entered Sandersville simultaneously with Fourteenth corps; skirmishing with enemy's cavalry. After entering town, the First and Second divisions, preceded by the cavalry, went to Tennille Station to destroy the railroad. The Michigan Engineers reported for duty, and accompanied the column to said station, No. 13. Third division covered trains at Sandersville.--Weather : Clear.--Road : Exceland Third divisions; cavalry on the flanks. The troops entered Sandersville simultaneously with Fourteenth corps; skirmishing with enemy's cavalry. After entering town, the First and Second divisions, preceded by the cavalry, went to Tennille Station to destroy the railroad. The Michigan Engineers reported for duty, and accompanied the column to said station, No. 13. Third division covered trains at Sandersville.--Weather : Clear.--Road : Excellent.--Supplies: Plenty.--Distance: Twelve miles.
November 27. Order of march: First division, preceded by the cavalry, moved south of Georgia Central Railroad, while Second division and Michigan Engineers destroyed the same to within five miles of Davisboro. The Third division and trains moved from Sandersville to Davisboro.--Weather: Fine.--Road: Excellent; the bridge at Davisboro over Williamson's Swamp Creek was not destroyed.--Supplies: Plenty.--Distance: Fifteen miles.
nty-fourth, we crossed the Oconee and marched on Sandersville, arriving there on the twenty-seventh. On the tille, and crossing the Oconee River, we took the Sandersville road, and reached Sandersville on the twenty-sevSandersville on the twenty-seventh. Here I received orders from General Davis to hold the town until all the trains of the Fourteenth armir commands, and withdrew from the town. From Sandersville my brigade formed the rear-guard until we reached Louisville, November twenty-ninth. At Sandersville, tile Eighty-eighth Indiana lost one man captured by a se through Decatur, Lithonia, Congers, Covington, Sandersville, Louisville, Milledgeville, and striking the raiwelve miles. Twenty-sixth, moved at daylight for Sandersville; about four miles west of that place, my foragerers, and steadily drove the enemy to and through Sandersville, never checking the advance of the column. As ayed the bridge. On the twenty-sixth, arrived at Sandersville. November twenty-seventh, division started for
d the night of twenty-sixth November. Near Sandersville, there was some skirmishing, and the regimerough a bad swamp, and moved rapidly toward Sandersville. Heard brisk firing in front; formed line son, company C, wounded, knee, severe, near Sandersville. November 26.---Private John M. Hill, company C, wounded, thigh, severe, near Sandersville. December 10.--Private George Hohing, company l Circle, Madison, Milledgeville, Eatonton, Sandersville, Millen, Louisville, and Springfield, to wition, and we had no difficulty in occupying Sandersville. From this place, we moved to Tennille Staes. 26th. Moved at seven A. M., reached Sandersville at noon, halted one hour for dinner. Marcheight A. M. with the brigade, and camped at Sandersville at three P. M. 27th. Marched fourteen mt Milledgeville. November twenty-sixth, at Sandersville. November twenty-seventh, at Davisboro. Nay. On the twenty-sixth November we reached Sandersville, and the following day arrived at Davisboro[44 more...]
ge over the Ulcofauhatchee, and marched eighteen miles, during the day. 20th, 21st, and 22d, were passed in marching. 23d. Reached and encamped in the city of Milledgeville. 24th. Marched at nine o'clock A. M., moving on the road to Sandersville. 25th. Moved forward a few miles to Buffalo Creek. Over this stream we threw a pontoonbridge, and also built one small trestle-bridge during the night. 26th. Took up the pontoon-bridge and marched the same day to Sandersville, a distaSandersville, a distance of ten miles. 27th. Sent Major Downey with two companies and one hundred and twenty feet of bridge, to report to General Baird, whose division marched on the extreme left flank. The remainder of my command moved on the river road from Louisville, with Generals Carlin's and Morgan's divisions of the Fourteenth corps. 28th. Continued our march to Louisville; reached there the same evening. Found Colonel Moore's bridge thrown over the large Ogeechee, and Major Downey's thrown over the
reekWarm, fine weatherGood countrySkirmish with the enemy in evening; passed Hebron. General Sherman joined us. Saturday, Nov. 267 00 A. M.10 A. M. by odom.8 SandersvilleWarm, fine weatherGood countrySkirmish with enemy on entering town; we laid by here all afternoon; Fourteenth corps passing through. Sunday, Nov. 279 00 A. M.6 30 P. M.1527DavisboroWarm, fine weatherGood countryBurnt court-house and jail at Sandersville before we marched, and cut down the liberty-pole. Monday, Nov. 287 30 A. M.12 M.923Ogeechee RiverWarm, fine weatherGood country swamp badFirst and Second divisions sent down railroad to destroy it; found bridge burnt by rebels; laid by encamped seven (7) miles from the city. In continuing our march, we crossed Ogeechee Shoals, passing through Glosscock County, leaving Sparta to the left and Sandersville to the right. We reached Waynesboro on the evening of the twenty-seventh, built a barricade near the railroad, and occupied it with my regiment. During the n
and camped near Hebron at four P. M. Twenty-fifth, left camp at six A. M. Delayed at Buffalo Creek on account of bridges having been destroyed. Moved to near Sandersville. Cavalry had a severe skirmish with the enemy. Camped in line for the night. Twenty-sixth, left camp at seven A. M. The advance skirmishing to Sandersville.Sandersville. Ene my retreating. Moved to Tennille Station, three miles and a half. Destroyed immense amounts of cotton, both raw and manufactured. Destroyed one and a half miles of railroad, and large warehouses used by the rebel government to store provisions. Twenty-seventh, marched from Tennille to Davidsboro. Camped at four P. M. Twedgeville. Camped about four P. M. Twenty-fifth, marched at half-past 6 P. M. Made about eight miles. Twenty-sixth, marched at a quarter-past six A. M. Reached Sandersville at ten A. M., when we halted for dinner. We then marched to Tennille Station, on the Georgia Central Railroad, and halted for the night. Twenty-seventh, marc
ght, having marched only five (5) miles. Saturday, November twenty-sixth, marched at half-past 7 A. M., arriving at Sandersville soon after noon. At two P. M., we passed through the town, and struck the Georgia Central Railroad about four P. M., w 23d. In camp. 24th. Moved at ten A. M., on road to Hebron. 25th. Passed through Hebron. 26th. Entered Sandersville, and passed on to Tennille, on railroad, and camped three miles beyond it. 27th. Moved at seven A. M., and tore upouacked at half-past 9 P. M. 26th. Marched at seven A. M., the regiment guarding ammunition-train. Passed through Sandersville at half-past 1 P. M. Marched to Tennille Station, on the Macon and Savannah Railroad, reaching that point at half-past swamp and Big Buffalo Creek, and encamped. 26th. On the march. Advance-guard of the division passed through Sandersville, Georgia, and encamped at night near the railroad. 27th. Command was engaged in destroying railroad. Encamped at elev