Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) or search for Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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aduated first in his class at West Point. He served as an assistant engineer in the building of Fortress Monroe from 1849 to 1852, and later became assistant instructor of practical military engineering at West Point. When the war broke out he had abundant opportunity to put his learning to the test, and proved one of the ablest military engineers in the Federal service. He acted as chief engineer of the Port Royal expeditionary corps in 1861-62; was chief engineer at the siege of Fort Pulaski, Georgia, from February to April, 1862, conducted the land operations against Charleston, fought at Drewry's Bluff, and in the defense of Washington against Early. On March 13, 1865, he was brevetted successively brigadier-general and major-general in the regular army, and on December 5, 1865, he resigned from the volunteer service He was the author of many engineering books and treatises. Gillmore studying the map of Charleston in 1863, while he drew his ring of fire round the city M
General Quincy A. Gillmore was the reduction of Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River, which fell April 11, 1862. the upper photograph shows the Third Rhode Island Artillery at drill in the Fort, and the lower shows battery a, looking toward Tybee. Behind the parapet is part of the remains of the covered way used by the Confederates during the bombardment. The parapets have been repaired, all is in order, and a lady in the costume of the day graces the Fort with her presence. Pulaski mounted forty-eight guns in all. Twenty bore upon Tybee Island, from which the bombardment was conducted. They included five 10-inch Columbiads, nine 8-inch Columbiads, three 42-pounders, three 10-inch mortars, one 12-inch mortar, one 24-pounder howitzer, two 12-pounder howitzers, twenty 32-pounders, and two 4 1/2-inch Blakely rifled guns. Against these General Gillmore brought six 10-inch and four 8-inch Columbiads, five 30-pounder Parrotts, twelve 13-inch and four 10-inch siege mortars,