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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 208 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 66 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1865., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Waynesborough (Georgia, United States) or search for Waynesborough (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
enty-five or eighty Tennessee riflemen on foot, and McClanahan's six-gun battery, arrested their charge and drove them back, when we were permitted to move off without further molestation. The next day Hunter proceeded to Staunton, only eleven miles from the battle-field, and was there joined by Crook and Averill, increasing his force to some 18,000 men. We camped that night at Fisherville, seven miles east of Staunton, on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, and next morning fell back to Waynesborough, at the western base of the Blue Ridge, where we supposed Hunter would attempt to cross Rockfish Gap on his way to Lynchburg. Up to his occupation of Staunton, where his army was so much strengthened by Crook and Averill as to relieve his mind of all apprehension of disaster, his conduct had been soldiery, striking his blows only at armed men. But at Staunton he commenced burning private property, and, as will be seen further on, the passion for house-burning grew upon him, and a new sy
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
ompletely foiled in his attempt upon the communications leading to Richmond by way of the Virginia Central Railroad and James River canal. Returning to Lee's army, the Black Horse were occupied in arduous picket duty, and engaged in daily skirmishes, taking part, also, in the overthrow of Wilson's cavalry raiders. In August, 1864, General Fitz Lee's cavalry division was sent to reinforce Early in the Valley, who had fallen back after his campaign against Washington. In the fight at Waynesborough the Black Horse was the leading squadron of the Fourth Regiment, and was especially complimented by General Early. After driving the enemy through the town, the Confederate cavalry halted on a hill in the western suburbs, when an officer in the Union service, Captain J. A. Bliss, faced his squadron, and, placing himself at its head, ordered a charge. But his men followed not their gallant leader. He, not looking to see, or, as it appeared, caring whether he was accompanied by his comm
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
he bridge over North river, near Mount Crawford. The First New York Cavalry, under Lieutenant Colonel Battersby, was ordered to swim the river a mile above the bridge, and charge the rebels in flank; which they did in fine style-driving them out of their works, pursuing them about ten miles, capturing prisoners, guns, and wagons, and saving the bridge over Middle river. For this General Custer, to whose division they belonged, complimented them in person. Next day Custer advanced upon Waynesborough, where Early's forces were intrenched, and, after some severe fighting, charged the works, driving the enemy out, capturing nearly every man, and all the guns and material of war. The First New York Cavalry led the charge. Again at Dinwiddie Court-House and Five Forks, the regiment won fresh laurels under the eyes of Sheridan and Custer. At Sailor's creek the First New York (Lincoln) Cavalry led the charge over the enemy's works, capturing General Ewell and his staff and hundreds of pr