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John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 194 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 74 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 74 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 72 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 47 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 33 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army. You can also browse the collection for West Point (Georgia, United States) or search for West Point (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

Chapter 1: Birth and parentage early education West Point enters the army services in the Mexican War The name of McClellan, common in many parts he show-boy of a school. In June, 1842, he entered the Military Academy at West Point, being then fifteen years and six months old. He went there in obedience to hthe Government cannot entirely guard the young men committed to its charge at West Point. He showed at the start a more careful intellectual training than most of thwork, but, when made, they were securely held. At the close of the course at West Point, he stood second in general rank in the largest class which had ever left the46, before he had completed his twentieth year. Few young men have ever left West Point better fitted by mental discipline and solid attainments for the profession ohe purpose of making temporary bridges. then in the course of organization at West Point, under charge of Captain A. J. Swift. The first lieutenant was G. W. Smith,
warlike operations then in progress, to examine the military systems of the great Powers of Europe, and to report such plans and suggestions for improving the organization and discipline of our own army as they might derive from such observation. The officers selected for this trust were Major — now Colonel — Delafield, of the Engineers, Major Mordecai, of the Ordnance, and Captain McClellan. The last was by some years the youngest of the three, Colonel Delafield having been graduated at West Point in 1818, and Major Mordecai in 1823. The selection of so young a man for such a trust is a proof of the high reputation he had made for himself in the judgment of those by whom the choice was made; and it may be here mentioned that he was in the first instance designated for the commission by President Pierce himself, who had had an opportunity in the Mexican War to observe what manner of soldier and man ho was. Of the three officers, he, too, was the only one who had seen actual service
r been discouraged there. Many of the political leaders had long been looking forward to the time when the unhappy sectional contests which were distracting the country would blaze out into civil war, and preparing for it. In some of the States there had been military academies, where a military education had been obtained: so that they had a greater number of trained officers to put into their regiments. This gave them a considerable advantage at the start. Happily for us, graduates of West Point were scattered all over the North: to them the civil authority looked for assistance, and they rendered an assistance which cannot be too highly estimated. Ohio was as unprepared as other States. There was a small force of militia nominally organized; but the Constitution and laws of the State provided that all its officers should be elected by the men, and the Governor was limited, in his selection of officers in case the militia was called out, to the parties so chosen. In an emerge
urpose. Order was restored in Washington by a military police bureau, at the head of which were a provost-marshal and a body of efficient assistants. New defensive works were projected and thrown up. Everywhere the hum of active, organized, and harmonious industry was heard. A preliminary organization was made of the troops on hand into twelve brigades. These were all volunteers, except two companies of cavalry and four of artillery; but all the commanding officers had been educated at West Point, with the single exception of Colonel Blenker, who had had a good military training in Europe. On the 4th of August, 1861, General McClellan addressed to the President of the United States, at his request, a memorandum upon the objects of the war, the principles on which it should be conducted, and the operations by which it might be brought to a speedy and successful termination. As this is an important document in the history of the war, which should be carefully read by all who desi
Chapter 12: Farewell to the army reception at Trenton visit to Boston in the winter of 1863 oration at West Point in June, 1864 The reasons for this summary and abrupt dismissal of General McClellan, strange to say, have never been distinctly and officially given to the people of the United States. The President, in his annual message to Congress, only twenty-six days later than the date of his order of removal, says nothing upon the subject. The general-in-chief, in his Report, addressed to the Secretary of War, says, From the 17th of September till the 26th of October, McClellan's main army remained on the north bank of the Potomac, in the vicinity of Sharpsburg and Harper's Ferry. The long inactivity of so large an army in the face of a defeated foe and during the most favorable season for rapid movements and a vigorous campaign, was a matter of great disappointment and regret. Your letter of the 27th and my reply on the 28th of October, in regard to t
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army, Appendix. Oration at West Point. (search)
Appendix. Oration at West Point. Oration delivered by General Mcclellan at West Point, June 15, 1864, at the dedication of the site of a monument proposed to be erected in memory of the officers of the regular army who shall have fallen in battle during the present war. All nations have days sacred to the remembrance of West Point, June 15, 1864, at the dedication of the site of a monument proposed to be erected in memory of the officers of the regular army who shall have fallen in battle during the present war. All nations have days sacred to the remembrance of joy and of grief. They have thanksgivings for success, fasting and prayers in the hour of humiliation and defeat, triumphs and paeans to greet the living and laurel-crowned victor. They have obsequies and eulogies for the warrior slain on the field of battle. Such is the duty we are to perform to-day. The poetry, the historiesy common dangers and sufferings, on the toilsome march, in the dreary bivouac, amid the clash of arms, and in the presence of death on scores of battle-fields. West Point, with her large heart, adopts us all,--graduates and those appointed from civil life, officers and privates. In her eyes we are all her children, jealous of he