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John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 194 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 74 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 74 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 72 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 47 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 33 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for West Point (Georgia, United States) or search for West Point (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
nuary 15th, there has passed away another of our prominent Confederate leaders. As classmate of General R. E. Lee at West Point, his Chief of Artillery during the war, and his Pastor during his residence in Lexington, General Pendleton was closelyrother, Josiah S. Johnston, then a member of Congress, from Louisiana, a cadet in the United States Military Academy at West Point. He won the respect and love of professors and class-mates at West Point. Mr. Jefferson Davis says of him at this periWest Point. Mr. Jefferson Davis says of him at this period of his life: He was Sergeant-Major, and afterward was selected by the commandant for the Adjutancy, then the most esteemed office in the corps. He was not a hard student, though a fair one. His quickness supplied the defect. He did not have an bout 19,000 men. There was opposed to him, under the ablest leaders of the Union, General Anderson, his early friend at West Point; General Grant, who had seized Paducah, Ky.; General W. T. Sherman, General Thomas and General Wm. Nelson, aggregating
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
he pyrotechnic display at night, the trades parade on the 13th, the immense crowd of people, and other interesting features, seem to have made the celebration a grand success. We deeply regretted that we could not accept a highly appreciated invitation to be present. in the death of Rev. Dr. (General) W. N. Pendleton, at his home in Lexington, Va., on the evening of January 15th, there has passed away another of our prominent Confederate leaders. As classmate of General R. E. Lee at West Point, his Chief of Artillery during the war, and his Pastor during his residence in Lexington, General Pendleton was closely connected with our great chieftain in life, and now sleeps well, hard by his grave, while the spirits of the two soldiers, who were faithful to cross and country, doubtless bask together in the smiles of the great Captain of our Salvation. Of strong intellect, broad culture, firm convictions, devoted patriotism, earnest piety, and evangelical spirit, Dr. Pendleton made
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
ty, in 1822, was appointed by his elder brother, Josiah S. Johnston, then a member of Congress, from Louisiana, a cadet in the United States Military Academy at West Point. He won the respect and love of professors and class-mates at West Point. Mr. Jefferson Davis says of him at this period of his life: He was Sergeant-Major, anWest Point. Mr. Jefferson Davis says of him at this period of his life: He was Sergeant-Major, and afterward was selected by the commandant for the Adjutancy, then the most esteemed office in the corps. He was not a hard student, though a fair one. His quickness supplied the defect. He did not have an enemy in the corps or an unkind feeling to any one, though he was select in his associates. He graduated at the Military Aorce to defend this entire line of only about 19,000 men. There was opposed to him, under the ablest leaders of the Union, General Anderson, his early friend at West Point; General Grant, who had seized Paducah, Ky.; General W. T. Sherman, General Thomas and General Wm. Nelson, aggregating a force of 34,000 volunteers. General