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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Wilmington Island (Georgia, United States) or search for Wilmington Island (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
. R. P. Rodgers accompanied the expedition. The object of this move was to cut off the communication between Fort Pulaski and Savannah. The vessels entered Little Tybee River, or Freeborn Cut, and passed Fort Pulaski, but were not fired into, as the fort was not prepared for an enemy on this side. Preparations were at once made, however, to receive the expedition warmly on its return. The distance was that of long-range guns. The vessels were brought to a stop, after passing Wilmington Island, by heavy piles driven in a double row across the channel; they were anchored and a reconnoissance made, in boats, of the numerous creeks with which this country was intersected. At 5 P. M. five Confederate steamers, one of them carrying a square flag at the fore (probably Commodore Tatnall's), anchored at the mouth of the creek. They had it in their power to choose their distance, and this led to an expectation of an attack, but the night passed quietly. At 11:15 the five steam