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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The siege of Morris Island. (search)
and the heap of unburied dead without the sally-port showed how hasty had been the flight of the enemy. The troops returned to their camp about sunrise. The night of the 7th Admiral Dahlgren made an attack upon Sumter in boats manned by sailors and marines from the fleet. It was anticipated and repulsed. The next day an action took place between the iron-clad fleet and the enemy's batteries on Sullivan's Island, which was, probably, the severest naval engagement that ever took place in America. The enemy opened with a hundred guns of heavy calibre, but before the day was closed they had all been silenced. The New Ironsides, commanded by that noble old sailor, Commodore Rowan, played a giant's part in the fight. Another bombardment would have given us the island, but the Commodore was not permitted to renew the action in the morning, and the time given the enemy to strengthen his batteries rendered them quite impregnable. The engineers were immediately set to work erecting
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
be well greased, and the guns were to fire through small embrasures supplied with strong iron shutters. I approved also of the plan, making such suggestions as my experience as an engineer warranted. This battery took an active part in the attack, and was struck several times; but, excepting the jamming and disabling one of the shutters, the battery remained uninjured to the end of the fight. From Cumming's Point also, and in the same attack, was used the first rifled cannon fired in America. The day before I received orders from the Confederate Government, at Montgomery, to demand the evacuation or surrender of Fort Sumter, a vessel from England arriving in the outer harbor, signaled that she had something important for the Governor of the State. I sent out a harbor boat, which returned with a small Blakely rifled-gun, of two and a half inches diameter, with only fifty rounds of ammunition. I placed it at once behind a sand-bag parapet next to the Steven battery, where it