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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 10, 1863., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1863., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for Dixon, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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Affairs in Memphis look "grand, gloomy, and peculiar," reminding one of a picturesque old ruin deserted by its inhabitants — that is, when compared with the gay, lively, and prosperous city which we knew in times past. Few are left in the city who have participated in the secession movement, except the old men and ladies, who, God bless them, are always true to the South. The town is filled with extortioners, and a broader streak of Unionism cannot be found in any city south of Mason and Dixon's line. Large numbers of Northern men are here, many of whom are in the army, and have done good service to the Confederacy; but there are others rotten to the core, who will throw the Stars and Stripes to the breeze on the advent of the first Yankee soldier. All public property has been removed. The banks have sent away their funds and established their institutions elsewhere. The jail is being torn down to prevent its being used as a place of imprisonment to Southern citizens, and