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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 14 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 12 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 6 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. You can also browse the collection for Elmwood, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for Elmwood, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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ee, standing at the eastern front of Hollis Hall, was planted in 1792, and was the centre of patriotic meetings, and also meetings for the purpose of protesting against what they considered college injustice and tyranny. The father of Colonel T. W. Higginson set out many of the trees in the yard about 1818. To President Josiah Quincy, also, we owe much of the beauty of the college yard. Inseparably connected with Harvard College and Cambridge is the thought of Lowell and his beloved Elmwood. Among its noble trees are two sturdy elms brought from England before the Revolution. Lowell's fondness for these and, other trees near his home often crops out in his letters and poems. The group of willows on the bank of the Charles river near the Longfellow park are especially notable. Three of them are included in the River Front park. These willows, doubtless of an older date than the town of Cambridge itself, apart from their romantic association with a poet's nook of inspirat