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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 127 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 90 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 3 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for La Salle, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for La Salle, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 65 results in 37 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Accault, Michael, (search)
Accault, Michael, Explorer; was with La Salle when the latter discovered the Mississippi River. Later, with Louis Hennepin (q. v.), in the summer of 1679, he was sent by La Salle to explore the sources of the Mississippi. They went up the river as far the Falls of St. Anthony, where they were captured by Indians, but were rescued by Daniel Duluth, a French officer. In a few months they succeeded in reaching the tradingstation at Green Bay. Accault, Michael, Explorer; was with La Salle when the latter discovered the Mississippi River. Later, with Louis Hennepin (q. v.), in the summer of 1679, he was sent by La Salle to explore the sources of the Mississippi. They went up the river as far the Falls of St. Anthony, where they were captured by Indians, but were rescued by Daniel Duluth, a French officer. In a few months they succeeded in reaching the tradingstation at Green Bay.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allouez, Claude Jean, 1620- (search)
Allouez, Claude Jean, 1620- One of the earliest French missionaries and explorers of the country near the Great Lakes; born in 1620. After laboring among the Indians on the St. Lawrence several years, he penetrated the Western wilds and established a mission on the western shores of Lake Michigan, where he heard much about the Mississippi River, and made notes of what he learned concerning it. He explored Green Bay, and founded a mission among the Foxes, Miamis, and other tribes there. A mission begun by Marquette at Kaskaskia, Ill., Allouez sought to make his permanent field of labor; but when La Salle, the bitter opponent of the Jesuits, approached in 1679, he retired. Returning to the Miamis on the St. Joseph's River, he labored for a while, and died, Aug. 27, 1689. The contributions of Father Allouez to the Jesuit relations are most valuable records of the ideas and manners of the Indians.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Campbell, Alexander 1786-1866 (search)
Campbell, Alexander 1786-1866 Clergyman; born in County Antrim, Ireland, in June, 1786; educated at the University of Glasgow; came to the United States in 1809; and became pastor of a Presbyterian church in Washington county, Pa. In 1810 with his father he left the Presbyterian Church and founded in 1827 the sect which he named the Disciples of Christ (q. v.), and which is now known as the Campbellites. Mr. Campbell established Bethany College in 1840-41, and was its first president. He died in Bethany, W. Va., March 4, 1866. Legislator; born in Concord, Pa., Oct. 4, 1814; member of the State legislature in 1858-59; and member of Congress in 1875-77. He obtained wide repute as the Father of the greenbacks. He died in La Salle, Ill., Aug. 9, 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
,433,350183060Easton, Pa., to Bristol, Pa. Des Moines Rapids4,582,00918777 1-2At Des Moines Rapids, Mississippi River. Dismal Swamp2,800,000182222Connects Chesapeake Bay with Albemarle Sound. Erie 52,540,8001825381Albany, N. Y., to Buffalo, N. Y. Fairfield 4 1-2Alligator River to Lake Mattimuskeet, N. C. Galveston and Brazos340,000185138Galveston, Tex., to Brazos River, Tex. Hocking 975,481184342Carroll, O., to Nelsonville, O. Illinois and Michigan7,357,7871848102Chicago, 111., to La Salle, Ill. Illinois and Mississippi568,64318954 1-2Around lower rapids of Rock River, Ill. Connects with Mississippi River. Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co.4,455,0001821108Coalport, Pa., to Easton, Pa. Louisville and Portland5,578,63118722 1-2At Falls of Ohio River, Louisville, Ky. Miami and Erie8,062,6801835274Cincinnati, O., to Toledo, O. Morris 6,000,0001836103Easton, Pa., to Jersey City, N. J. Muscle Shoals and Elk River Shoals.3,156,919188916Big Muscle Shoals, Tenn., to Elk River Shoals, T
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
ourges determined to avenge the same, and with 150 men sailed for Florida, captured the fort on the St. John's River, and hanged the entire garrison, having affixed this inscription above them: Not as to Spaniards, but as murderers. Being too weak to attack St. Augustine, Gourges returned to France. The city of St. Augustine was founded in 1565, and was captured by Sir Francis Drake in 1586. The domain of Florida, in those times, extended indefinitely westward, and included Louisiana. La Salle visited the western portion in 1682, and in 1696 Pensacola was settled by Spaniards. At the beginning of the eighteenth century the English in the Carolinas attacked the Spaniards at St. Augustine; and, subsequently, the Georgians, under Oglethorpe, made war upon them. By the treaty of Paris, in 1763, Florida was exchanged by the Spaniards, with Great Britain, for Cuba, which had then recently been conquered by England. Soon afterwards, they divided the territory into east and west Flo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
his discoveries. In the mean time Count Frontenac, a noble of France, had been made governor of Canada, and found in La Salle a fit counsellor and assistant in his vast schemes of discovery. La Salle was sent to France, to enlist the Court and tLa Salle was sent to France, to enlist the Court and the ministers of Louis; and in 1677-78 returned to Canada, with full power under Frontenac to carry forward his grand enterprises. He had developed three great purposes: first, to realize the old plan of Champlain, the finding of a pathway to China ahe trade of the interior and checking the progress of Spain on the Gulf of Mexico. In pursuance of this plan, we find La Salle and his companions, in January, 1679, dragging their cannon and materials for ship-building around the Falls of Niagara,gara, laden with furs, and was never heard from. While awaiting the supplies which The Griffin was expected to bring, La Salle explored Lake Michigan to its southern extremity, ascended the St. Joseph, crossed the portage to Kankakee, descended th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Griffin, the (search)
Griffin, the The vessel of La Salle, on Lake Erie; built early in 1667, at the mouth of Cayuga Creek, not far below the site of Buffalo, and near the foot of Squaw Island. She was armed with a battery of seven small cannon and some muskets, and floated a flag bearing the device of an eagle. In August, the same year, she sailed for the western end of Lake Erie. This was the beginning of the commerce on the Great Lakes.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, Albert Bushnell 1854- (search)
ations in the history of the world have been famine, disease, and war. The days have passed when a Texan could curiously inquire: What do these people in New York mean by talking about people starving to death? Doesn't any darned fool know enough to take his rifle and shoot a beef critter when he's hungry? So far as we can look into the future, there will be bread and to spare for the children of this great household. Epidemics and disease may sweep through the country; since the days of La Salle fever and ague has been the bane of every community in the Mississippi Valley, except the one in which you happen to be living at the moment; but there has been no wide-sweeping epidemic in the West since the cholera year of 1832, and the sanitary conditions of the cities tend to improve. The advance of medical science makes the Mississippi Valley reasonably safe from devastation by pestilence. As for war, the Mississippi Valley has now no enemies within the Union, and from invasion St. L
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hennepin, Louis 1640- (search)
The next year he was ordered to Canada, and made the voyage with Bishop Laval and Robert Cavalier de la Salle. After preaching in Quebec, he went to the Indian mission at Fort Frontenac, and visited the Mohawk country. In 1678 he accompanied La Salle to the Western wilds, with Chevalier de Tonti and the Sieur de la Motte. Left by La Salle a little below the present site of Peoria to prosecute discoveries, he and two others penetrated to the Mississippi in a canoe, by way of the Illinois RivLa Salle a little below the present site of Peoria to prosecute discoveries, he and two others penetrated to the Mississippi in a canoe, by way of the Illinois River, in February and March, 1680. They explored the Mississippi northward until, in April, they were captured by a party of Sioux and carried to their villages. Hennepin, at the beginning of the voyage, had invoked the aid of St. Anthony of Padua, and when he discovered the great rapids of the upper Mississippi he gave them the name of Falls of St. Anthony. He claimed to have discovered the sources of the Mississippi, but never went above the Falls of St. Anthony, where he carved the arms of F
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Iberville, Pierre Le Moyne, Sieur Da 1661- (search)
for his operations against the English in the north and east of that province. In 1698 he was sent from France to the Gulf of Mexico with two frigates (Oct. 22), to occupy the mouth of the Mississippi and the region neglected after the death of La Salle. On finding that stream, he received from the Indians a letter left by De Tonty, in 1686, for La Salle. There he built Fort Biloxi, garrisoned it, and made his brother Bienville the King's lieutenant. In May, 1699, he returned to France, but La Salle. There he built Fort Biloxi, garrisoned it, and made his brother Bienville the King's lieutenant. In May, 1699, he returned to France, but reappeared at Fort Biloxi in January, 1700. On visiting France and returning in 1701, he found the colony reduced by disease, and transferred the settlement to Mobile, and began the colonization of Alabama. Disease had impaired his health, and the government called him away from his work as the founder of Louisiana. He was engaged in the naval service in the West Indies, where he was fatally stricken by yellow fever, dying in Havana, Cuba, July 9, 1706.
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