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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 79 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1864., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 11 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery.. You can also browse the collection for Ottawa, Ill. (Illinois, United States) or search for Ottawa, Ill. (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., The following is the correspondence between the two rival candidates for the United States Senate: (search)
f agreeable to you, I will indicate the following places as those most suitable in the several Congressional Districts at which we should speak, to wit: Freeport, Ottawa, Galesburg, Quincy, Alton, Jonesboro and Charleston. I will confer with you at the earliest convenient opportunity in regard to the mode of conducting the debatet point in each Congressional District, as stated in my previous letter, was received this morning. The times and places designated are as follows: Ottawa, La Salle CountyAugust 21st, 1858. Freeport, Stephenson CountryAugust 27th, 1858. Jonesboro, Union CountySeptember 15th, 1858. Charleston, Coles CountySeptember 18th, 1er 13th, 1858. Alton, Madison CountyOctober 15th, 1858. I agree to your suggestion that we shall alternately open and close the discussion. I will speak at Ottawa one hour, you can reply, occupying an hour and a half, and I will then follow for half an hour. At Freeport, you shall open the discussion and speak one hour, I
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., First joint debate, at Ottawa, August 21, 1858. (search)
First joint debate, at Ottawa, August 21, 1858. Mr. Douglas's speech. Ladies and Gentleman: I appear before you to-day for the purpose of discussing the leading political topics which now agitate the public mind. By an arrangement between Mr. Lincoln and myself, we are present here to-day for the purpose of having a joint discussion, as the representatives of the two great political parties of the State and Union, upon the principles in issue between those parties ; and this vast concou. I can proclaim them alike in the North, the South, the East, and the West; My principles will apply wherever the Constitution prevails and the American flag waves. I desire to know whether Mr. Lincoln's principles will bear transplanting from Ottawa to Jonesboro? I put these questions to him to-day distinctly, and ask an answer. I have a right to an answer for I quote from the platform of the Republican party, made by himself and others at the time that party was formed, and the bargain m
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Second joint debate, at Freeport, August 27, 1858. (search)
ht within the range of his half-hour speech at Ottawa. Of course there was brought within the scopetories which Judge Douglas propounded to me at Ottawa, he read a set of resolutions which he said Ju of this charge. I recurred to this charge at Ottawa. I shall not now have time to dwell upon it aa piece of evidence which I brought forward at Ottawa on Saturday, showing that he had made substantl questions to which I called his attention at Ottawa. He there showed no disposition, no inclinatid that amendment out of Mr. Lincoln's brain at Ottawa; but it seems that still haunts his imaginatio the interrogatories contained in my speech at Ottawa, and which he has pretended to reply to here the cannot answer the questions I put to him at Ottawa because the resolutions I read were not adopteday when I concluded to use the resolutions at Ottawa, I wrote to Charles H. Lanphier, editor of theradicted. When I quoted the resolutions at Ottawa and questioned Mr. Lincoln in relation to them[1 more...]
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Third joint debate, at Jonesboro, September 15, 1858. (search)
bting the genuineness of this document, since his production of those Springfield resolutions at Ottawa. I do not wish to dwell at any great length upon this matter. I can say nothing when a long stas you will see by the La Salle Democrat and Ottawa Free Trader I took at Peru on the 5th and at Ottawa on the 7th, the affirmative side of interrogatories 1st and 2d, and in relation to the admission I answer most decidedly in the affirmative, and for reasons set forth in my reported remarks at Ottawa last Monday. To your fifth interrogatory I also reply in the affirmative most cordially, and William Reddick! another one of Judge Douglas's friends that stood on the stand with him at Ottawa, at the time the Judge says my knees trembled so that I had to be carried away. The names are aMissouri Republican-on the 9th of this month, in, which Judge Douglas says : You know at Ottawa, I read this platform, and asked him if he concurred in each and all of the principles set forth
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fourth joint debate, at Charleston, September 18, 1858. (search)
not that power. If the State of Illinois had that power I should be opposed to the exercise of it. That is all I have to say about it. Judge Douglas has told me that he heard my speeches north and my speeches south — that he had heard me at Ottawa and at Freeport in the north, and recently at Jonesboro in the south, and there was a very different cast of sentiment in the speeches made at the different points. I will not charge upon Judge Douglas that be willfully misrepresents me, but I c Judge Douglas. If the Judge now says that he offers this as a sort of a set-off to what I said to-day in reference to Trumbull's charge, then I remind him that he made this charge before I said a word about Trumbull's. He brought this forward at Ottawa, the first time we met face to face ; and in the opening speech that Judge Douglas made, he attacked me in regard to a matter ten years old. Isn't he a pretty man to be whining about people making charges against him only two years old! The
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fifth joint debate, at Galesburgh, October 7, 1858. (search)
to call to the Judge's attention an attack he made upon me in the first one of these debates, at Ottawa, on the 21st of August. In order to fix extreme Abolitionism upon me, Judge Douglas read a set On the 21st of August last, all three--Lanphier, Douglas and Harris — reattempted it upon me at Ottawa. It has been clung to and played out again and again as an exceedingly high trump by this blessunds it in Charleston. Mr. Lincoln has devoted considerable time to the circumstance that at Ottawa I read a series of resolutions as having been adopted at Springfield, in this State, on the 4th They were adopted in a majority of the Republican counties in the State; and when I asked him at Ottawa whether they formed the platform upon which he stood, he did not answer, and I could not get an will not permit him to sanction that doctrine. And complains because the resolutions I read at Ottawa made him, as a member of the party, responsible for sanctioning the doctrine of no more slave St
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Sixth joint debate, at Quincy, October 13, 1858. (search)
ly the same thing. It was in our first meeting, at Ottawa — and I will say a word about where it was, and thewas in, after awhile — but at our first meeting, at Ottawa, I read an extract from an old speech of mine, made that quotation from my old speech, which I read at Ottawa, I made the comments which were reported at that ti that Judge Douglas had attempted to use upon me at Ottawa, and commented at some length upon the fact that thge understood by it; but in our first discussion at Ottawa, he led off by charging a bargain, somewhat corruptre in regard to these resolutions: I quoted them at Ottawa merely to ask Mr. Lincoln whether he stood on that Freeport to the questions which I Propounded him at Ottawa, based upon the platform adopted by a majority of t other counties. I do not question that he said at Ottawa what he quoted, but that only convicts him further, having upon a previous occasion made the speech at Ottawa as the one he took an extract from, at Charleston,
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., The last joint debate, at Alton, October 15, 1858. (search)
ing that all men were created equal. The issue thus being made up between Mr. Lincoln and myself on three points, we went before the people of the State. During the following seven weeks, between the Chicago speeches and our first meeting at Ottawa, he and I addressed large assemblages of the people in many of the central counties. In my speeches I confined myself closely to those three positions which he had taken, controverting his proposition that this Union could not exist as our fatheou will wage a war against the Southern States and their institutions until you force them to abolish slavery every where. After having pressed these arguments home on Mr. Lincoln for seven weeks, publishing a number of my speeches, me met at Ottawa in joint discussion, and he then began to crawfish a little, and let himself down. I there propounded certain questions to him. Amongst others, I asked him whether he would vote for the admission of any more slave States in the event the people
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Speech of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, at Columbus Ohio, September, 1859. (search)
t it is not entirely safe, when one is misrepresented under his very nose, to allow the misrepresentation to go uncontradicted. I therefore propose, here at the outset, not only to say that this is a misrepresentation, but to show conclusively that it is so ; and you will bear with me while I read a couple of extracts from that very memorable debate with Judge Douglas last year, to which this newspaper refers. In the first pitched battle which Senator Douglas and myself had, at the town of Ottawa, I used the language which I will now read. Having been previously reading an extract, I continued as follows : Now, gentlemen, I dont want to read at any greater length, but this is the true complexion of all I have ever said in regard to the institution of slavery and the black race. This is the whole of it, and any thing that argues me into his idea of perfect social and political equality with the negro, is but a specious and fantastic arrangement of words, by which a man can p