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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 68 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 52 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 34 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 34 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 30 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) or search for Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
ory belonged exclusively to General Grant and no one can take from him one iota of the credit of that great military feat, in which he showed his fitness to lead the armies of the Union. The results of this victory were that the whole of Kentucky and Tennessee at once fell into the hands of the national forces — the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers were opened to national vessels for hundreds of miles. Nashville, the capital of Tennessee and a place of great strategic importance, fell. Bowling Green had become untenable as soon as Donelson was attacked, and was abandoned on the 14th of February, the day before the Confederate works on the Cumberland were carried, while Columbus and the other end of the strategic line were evacuated early in March, thus leaving the Mississippi river free from the Confederate flag from St. Louis to Arkansas. The news of this victory was very encouraging to the Union people, especially when they beheld its results. When city after city fell and str