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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 54 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 1 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 16 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 10 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 8 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 6 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Lecompton (Kansas, United States) or search for Lecompton (Kansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

eder William Philips John W. Whitfield civil War in Kansas Wm. Dow sheriff Jones nomination of Fremont President Fillmore at Albany election of Buchanan Lecompton Wyandot admission of Kansas as a Free State. Franklin Pierce was inaugurated President on the 4th of March, 1853. Never were the visible omens more auspicid and surprised by various parties of enemies, part of them under Gen. Atchison, who, with the Platte County rifles, and two pieces of artillery, approached from Lecompton on the west, while another force, composed in good part of the volunteers from the Atlantic Southern States, under Col. Buford, beleaguered it on the east. Theyeach party held its own conventions and elections independent of the other. The pro-Slavery Legislature called a Constitutional Convention in 1857, which met at Lecompton on the first Monday of September. That Convention proceeded, of course, to form a pro-Slavery Constitution, which they pretended to submit to the people at an e
ting future invasions, or rendering them comparatively infrequent. The Rev. Martin White, for his services in this expedition, was chosen a member of the next Lecompton (pro-Slavery) Legislature, which he attended; and, in the course of its deliberations, he entertained his fellow-members with a graphic and humorous account of hpanions, three of whom afterward fought under him at Harper's Ferry, and three negroes, beside women and children. He was pursued by thirty pro-Slavery men from Lecompton so sharply that he was compelled to halt and prepare for a defense. He took possession of two deserted log-cabins in the wilderness, which his pursuers surrounded, at a respectful distance, and sent to Atchison and Lecompton for reenforcements. From Atchison, twelve men arrived, making their force forty-two to his eight. As they were preparing to attack, Brown and his seven companions suddenly issued from the wood, in order of battle, when the valorous posse turned and fled. They pro
ast his vote for Pennington, and elected him — he having the exact number necessary to a choice. John W. Forney, anti-Lecompton Dem., was soon after elected Clerk by a close vote. The majority in the Senate was not merely Democratic of tile Lecompton or extreme pro-Slavery caste; it was especially hostile to Senator Douglas, and determined to punish him for his powerful opposition to the Lecompton bill, by reading him out of the party. To this end, Mr. Jefferson Davis submitted Feb. 2, e hold and enjoy the same while the territorial condition remains. The discussion of the series consumed a large share of the time and attention of the Senate during the entire session. It ultimately transpired that they were the work of a Lecompton or regular Democratic caucus, and that their ulterior object was the reading of Mr. Douglas, and other tenacious champions of Popular Sovereignty, out of the Democratic party. At length, May 24, 1860. the Senate came to a vote on the first
n the American Convention of 1856, 247; his letter to the President, 467-8. lawless, Judge, his charge at St. Louis, 134. Lawrence, Abbott, of Mass., in the Whig Convention of 1848, 192. Lawrence. Kansas, the founding of, 236; illegal voting at, 238; beleaguered by Atchison. etc., 243-4; Brown's speech at, 284-5; the fight at, 285. lay, Col. C. W., goes to Charleston, 442. Leavenworth, Kansas, outrages at, 239; 335. Leavitt, Judge, in case of Margaret Garner, 219. Lecompton, Kansas, Convention at, 240. Lecompton Constitution, the, submitted to a vote of the people, 249-50; finally rejected, 250. Lee, Col. (Union,) at Ball's Bluff, 623. Lee, Gen. Robert E., brings reenforcements against old Brown at Harper's Ferry, 293; takes command( of Rebel forces in Virginia, 518, commands in West Virginia, 525-6. Leeman, Wm. H., killed at Harper's Ferry, 292. Leigh, Benj. Watkins, Comm'r to S. C., 100; 110. Lesesne, Mr., of S. C., favors cooperation, 333.