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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 5 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Glasgow, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Glasgow, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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ict. Marshall had 1,600 men, 500 of them unarmed. With these troops he took position in observation, secure in these mountain fastnesses, but without power for an advance. It will be observed that all these events took place in the last days of October or early in November. General (then Colonel) John C. Brown informs the writer that, at this juncture, he was accompanying General Johnston on a reconnaissance, from Bowling Green, up the Big Barren River, and through the country toward Glasgow. The general was enjoying the recreation of the march, and the pleasures of the bivouac, when, late one night, while they were sitting around the camp-fire, a telegram was handed him, advising him of Grant's movement upon Belmont. After reading it carefully, he passed it round to the other officers, and remarked, This indicates a simultaneous movement along the whole line. He at once ordered Colonel Brown to take 100 mounted men, before daylight the next morning, and proceed down the Bi
Oakland, ten miles in rear of Hindman's, with Morgan's cavalry, in the direction of Brownsville. Helm, with his regiment of Kentucky Cavalry, has been ordered back to Skegg's Creek bridge and the Barren bridge, on the route from Scottsville to Glasgow. His scouts keep the country under observation toward Woodsonville and Columbia. Should the enemy move in force on this route, the bridge across the Barren and other streams toward Glasgow will be burned. The remainder of the divisions of HarGlasgow will be burned. The remainder of the divisions of Hardee and Buckner, and the sixty days State troops from Mississippi, recently arrived, under the command of Major-General R. Davis, are stationed here-my whole force amounting, as before remarked, to 17,000 men. A brigade, under General Clark, is posted at Hopkinsville, to guard against the movements of the enemy on the Lower Green River toward Clarksville, and to follow their movements should they attempt to cooperate with the movements of the enemy in my front; his force should be much grea