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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 5 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Glasgow, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Glasgow, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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s. The remainder retreated to Loudon, and succeeded in holding the crossing of the river. In the mean time Jones had moved down on the north side of the Holston River, to Rogersville, with some three thousand five hundred cavalry, and surprised our garrison at that place, capturing four pieces of artillery, thirty-six wagons, and six hundred and fifty men. The Department of the Cumberland. When General Rosecrans took command of the army in Kentucky, it was massed at Bowling Green and Glasgow. The base of supplies was then at Louisville. A few days later it was advanced to Nashville, which was made a secondary base. After the battle of Perryville, and our pursuit to Mount Vernon, as stated in my last report, the rebel army retreated across the Cumberland Mountains, leaving a force in Cumberland Gap; then moved down the Tennessee Valley to Chattanooga, and thence by Stevenson and Tullahoma to Murfreesboro, a distance of four hundred miles, while our army had marched to Nas
ome to a field of more active work, and put in our stead strangers, who of course do not understand Kentucky in any way better than we do. We know her geography, the advantages and disadvantages; her friends and her most dangerous enemy — the sneaking traitor that lives there. But, being perfectly willing to work in the cause of our country anywhere, and, after resting from marching so long, we left champing the bit for East-Tennessee. September twenty-fifth, we joined General Manson at Glasgow, who had already begun to move out. The weather having been dry so long that the roads were very dusty and water scarce along the road, consequently our march was made with moderation. Camped near Gray's Cross-Roads. September twenty-sixth, marched to Marrowbone by two o'clock P. M., and went into camp. September twenty-seventh, crossed Cumberland River at Neelie's Ferry, and camped. September twenty-eighth, marched slowly till about four o'clock in the evening, and went into camp