hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Hector (Kentucky, United States) or search for Hector (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 12, line 429 (search)
r, with which the wounded me. You see the scar. The old scar still is surely visible! “Those were my days of youth and strength, and then I ought to have warred against the citadel of Pergama. I could have checked, or even vanquished, the arms of Hector: but, alas, Hector had not been born, or was perhaps a boy. Old age has dulled my youthful strength. What use is it, to speak of Periphas, who overcame Pyretus, double-formed? Why tell of Ampyx, who with pointless shaft, victorious thrust EchecluHector had not been born, or was perhaps a boy. Old age has dulled my youthful strength. What use is it, to speak of Periphas, who overcame Pyretus, double-formed? Why tell of Ampyx, who with pointless shaft, victorious thrust Echeclus through the face? Macareus, hurling a heavy crowbar pierced Erigdupus and laid him low. A hunting spear that Nessus strongly hurled, was buried in the groin of Cymelus. Do not believe that Mopsus, son of Ampycus, was merely a prophet of events to come, he slew a daring two-formed monster there. Hodites tried in vain to speak, before his death, but could not, for his tongue was nailed against his chin, his chin against his throat. “Five of the centaurs Caeneus put to death: Styphelus, Bromus, a