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uthern woman. Meridian, February 22, 1864. my dear mother: As one of our neighbors go down to Mobile to-morrow, I will send you a few lines to let you know how we came out in this terrible raid. My husband left here at ten o'clock A. M., as guide to General Polk. The Yankees came in at four P. M., in full force. They skirmished a little in our yard, which frightened us very much. The small portion of our servants went away with my husband, so no one remained with me but Violetta, Louisa, Lucinda, my mother-in-law, and three children. After the skirmishing stopped, the mob ran around, going into the houses, breaking open doors, trunks, locks, etc., tearing up and destroying every thing they could. Caught all the chickens in the place in half an hour. I begged for my things and saved nearly every thing; for while I was talking to the part of the mob who had entered my house, I sent mother off to look up some of the Generals, and to try to get a guard, telling them that I
Doc. 132.-Colonel Gallup's expedition into Western Virginia. camp Louisa, Lawrence Co., Ky., Feb. 20, 1864. On the twelfth instant our District Commander, Colonel Gallup, with his usual sympathy for suffering Unionists, sent a scout over into Western Virginia to rid the citizens of the unscrupulous Colonel Ferguson, who, with his plundering band, had pillaged the country until even the women and children were brought to starvation. This impudent rebel, knowing that Virginia was not in this district, and therefore not under the protection of our gallant Colonel, sent him word that he would quarter there until March, but would not molest our troops provided we would let him alone. Colonel Gallup treated the message with that silent contempt it deserved. His silence was taken for acquiescence by the other party. So the wily old fox was allowed to play around until he met with an unpleasant surprise in the capture of himself and command. This happened in the following mann