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day and night, General Blair's corps, Third division, Fifteenth corps, and all the cavalry had crossed. The hill on the east side was steep, and the heavy rain during the night rendered the ascent extremely difficult. On the morning of the nineteenth instant, regiments were detailed in each division to assist the trains in getting up the hill. The Fifteenth corps, following the cavalry, took country roads to Hillsborough. The Seventeenth corps moved to the vicinity of Hillsborough, via Monticello. The roads now becoming very heavy, the progress was slow. We had two bridges at the point of crossing, and they were kept full all day. Yet the crossing was not completed by the rearguard until the morning of the twentieth instant. November 20, 1864. The command moved on Gordon in two columns, General Kilpatrick, with his cavalry, taking the Clinton road and the river-road toward Macon. General Osterhaus, with the bridge-train, cavalry-train, etc., moved toward Clinton; General B
vember 18, 1864. The nearest division was pushed to Hatting's or Planters' Factory early next morning, and a part of it crossed over by the ferry. The bridge arrived at about ten A. M., was laid, and the troops commenced crossing at one P. M.; during that day and night, General Blair's corps, Third division, Fifteenth corps, and all the cavalry had crossed. The hill on the east side was steep, and the heavy rain during the night rendered the ascent extremely difficult. On the morning of the nineteenth instant, regiments were detailed in each division to assist the trains in getting up the hill. The Fifteenth corps, following the cavalry, took country roads to Hillsborough. The Seventeenth corps moved to the vicinity of Hillsborough, via Monticello. The roads now becoming very heavy, the progress was slow. We had two bridges at the point of crossing, and they were kept full all day. Yet the crossing was not completed by the rearguard until the morning of the twentieth instant.