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shing in our rear, determined to give the rebels a lesson, and, concealing the Thirty-third regiment on each side of the road, marched on. The over-confident bushwhackers — for such alone they are — followed, and, as usual, fired on our rear. A return fire from the infantry from the roadside greeted them, and killed fifteen and wounded several. Since then they have been very cautious of any too near approach to our columns. At Salem we turned north on the road over Catawba Mountain to Newcastle, and on the night of the twenty-third we encamped at Sweet Springs, in whose beautiful grounds of old the chivalry were wont to assemble and disport themselves. Passing the night of the twenty-fourth at White Sulphur, we reached Meadow Bluffs on the twenty-fifth, without incident, save the great need of rations, which began to be felt so pressingly in the ranks. On the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh the march continued; on the latter day the command meeting wagons with abundant rations.
culty of getting intelligible information as to the roads and crossings in this comparatively unknown region. It was at first determined to make the passage of the Pamunkey with the Sixth and Second corps at Hanover, and the Fifth and Ninth at Newcastle ferries, but engineer officers accompanying General Sheridan, reported two good crossings a short distance above and below Hanovertown, and the orders of march were accordingly modified, and double pontoon bridges were thrown across at Hanovertts (the Eighteenth corps with part of the Tenth), brought by General W. F. Smith from White House. This column had been ordered by General Grant from White House to New Cold Harbor, but by an error in the telegraph the despatch named the point Newcastle. The mistake was corrected, but not until he had neared the latter place, so that this corps was compelled to make a fatiguing march of five and twenty miles, and arrived at Cold Harbor on the afternoon of Wednesday, just in time to take part
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), General Grant's headquarters, near Hanovertown, south bank of the Pamunkey May 29, (search)
d division of cavalry, under General Wilson, covered the rear and trains. The heads of the two columns bivouacked on Friday night about ten miles from the Pamunkey. Great trouble had been found in laying out the lines of march, owing to the difficulty of getting intelligible information as to the roads and crossings in this comparatively unknown region. It was at first determined to make the passage of the Pamunkey with the Sixth and Second corps at Hanover, and the Fifth and Ninth at Newcastle ferries, but engineer officers accompanying General Sheridan, reported two good crossings a short distance above and below Hanovertown, and the orders of march were accordingly modified, and double pontoon bridges were thrown across at Hanovertown, and the Fifth, Sixth, and Second corps passed over them in the course of yesterday. The Ninth did not get across until early this morning. The first mentioned corps were immediately put in position as they got over on the range of hills almo