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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 12 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Sir Richard Francis Burton) 2 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Art of Poetry: To the Pisos (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts). You can also browse the collection for Piso (Kentucky, United States) or search for Piso (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 2 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts), chapter 32 (search)
i. This step brought the revolution to a head. It is said that the first idea was to put the consuls to death that the men might be discharged from their oath; then, on learning that no religious obligation could be dissolved by a crime, they decided, at the instigation of a certain Sicinius, to ignore the consuls and withdraw to the Sacred Mount, which lay on the other side of the Anio, three miles from the City. This is a more generally accepted tradition than the one adopted by Piso that the secession was made to the Aventine. There, without any commander, in a regularly entrenched camp, taking nothing with them but the necessaries of life, they quietly maintained themselves for some days, neither receiving nor giving any provocation. A great panic seized the City, mutual distrust led to a state of universal suspense. Those plebeians who had been left by their comrades in the City feared violence from the patricians; the patricians feared the plebeians who sti