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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 65 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 20 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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lve months unarmed men against the steady refusal of the department, he would not be surprised at any effort to repress promptly such disingenuous practices. General Johnston's letter, however, evoked no reply as to the other matters involved. The secretary had probably said in a former letter, of December 22d, all that he had to say on the subject. These are his words: Zollicoffer reports himself in almost undisputed possession of the banks of the Cumberland, from the forks near Somerset, all the way down to the Tennessee line, and seems able to guard your right flank, so that your front alone appears to be seriously threatened, and I had hoped you had sufficient force in your intrenched lines to defy almost any front attack. I have not, unfortunately, another musket to send you. We have an immensely valuable cargo of arms and powder in Nassau, blockaded there by a Yankee gunboat, that I am trying to get out. But, if we succeed, it will be too late for your present need
Louisville, and have thrown forward a strong advance to Woodsonville, with which Terry's cavalry had a successful rencounter on the 17th instant, in which we had the misfortune to lose the gallant leader of it. These forces, in heavy masses, are stationed at Woodsonville, Bacon Creek, Nolin, etc. There is also a corps of about 6,000 men at Columbia, which is being rapidly reinforced. There is another considerable force at Lebanon, at the terminus of the Louisville Railroad, and another at Somerset. The banks of Green River from Munfordsville down are unoccupied, as the country is quite rugged, except by a force under General T. L. Crittenden. These dispositions of their troops are in accordance with information received from various sources, and lead to the belief that a forward movement will very soon be made in this direction; but, at present, I can only conjecture whether they will make their attack here, or turn my right, or, relying upon their superiority of numbers, attemp
cribes this point as commanding the converging roads from Somerset and Columbia, as in a fertile and well-stocked country, wost essential route to be guarded is that leading through Somerset and Monticello, as, in my opinion, most practicable for tsed Fishing Creek and reconnoitred the Federal camps near Somerset. On the 8th, at Fishing Creek, the cavalry was fired on erawed and put upon his guard, retired three miles behind Somerset, intrenched himself in a strong position, and called louder's letters correctly estimate the force of the enemy at Somerset at seven infantry regiments and some cavalry, which agreeill allow. . . . I will endeavor to prevent the forces at Somerset and Columbia from uniting. The proximity of the terminusor above. Mill Springs, and lies between our position and Somerset. It is more than thirty miles long, runs in a deep ravinistant from that on the west. There are two crossings to Somerset, seven and eleven miles from here. Crittenden's weekl