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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Centreville (Louisiana, United States) or search for Centreville (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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f one sought a Louisiana command, he had first to ask where Jackson's corps was. Puritan though he was, Jackson had learned to value the Louisianians for their freedom from straggling—not even frowning upon their partiality for waltz music. Behind these, the soldier in Jackson had seen that courage which never faltered and had understood those young hearts, chirpy as crickets, which never weakened before a long march or quailed in front of the foe. The brigade was originally organized at Centerville in 1861, with the Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth Louisiana, Wheat's battalion closing the list. Its first commander, General Walker, was killed at Gaines' Mill. In Richard Taylor it had a leader—a fighter himself who would not willingly have stinted a man's love for battle. He did not stay long with them, being promoted to major-general after the Seven Days campaign, and soon transferred to the Trans-Mississippi, where, with his own good sword, he was to carve his name in the. Gold