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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 138 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) or search for Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
our men rang out as the word passed, and again the forest echoed with the strains of the Star-spangled banner from the long-silent bands. Firing died away, the men began to mingle in spite of everything, and about 2 o'clock next morning came the long, gray envelope that meant surrender. Formalities alone remained; these were long, but the articles were signed on the afternoon of the 8th; a moment later a long train of wagons loaded with rations for the famished garrison moved down the Clinton road, and on the morning of the 9th a picked force of eight regiments, under Brigadier-General George L. Andrews, marched in with bands playing and colors flying; the Confederates stacked arms and hauled down their flag, and the National ensign floated in its stead. By General Banks's order, General Gardner's sword was returned to him in the presence of his men in recognition of the heroic defense — a worthy act, well merited. But, stout as the defense had been, the besiegers had on the