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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 138 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) or search for Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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The command moved on Gordon in two columns, General Kilpatrick, with his cavalry, taking the Clinton road and the river-road toward Macon. General Osterhaus, with the bridge-train, cavalry-train, etc., moved toward Clinton; General Blair, with his command, via Bluntsville. The head of the right column encamped at Clinton, and the left near Fortsville. General Kilpatrick waited at Clinton uClinton, and the left near Fortsville. General Kilpatrick waited at Clinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out toward Macon, on the left Macon road. He met the enemy's cavalry about four miles from Macon, drove them in, and charged Clinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out toward Macon, on the left Macon road. He met the enemy's cavalry about four miles from Macon, drove them in, and charged their works, defended by infantry and artillery. The head of his column got inside the works, but could not hold them. He succeeded in reaching the railroad, and destroyed about one mile of the traorps, with bridge-train, having roads that were almost impassable, only reached the vicinity of Clinton at night. This morning, fifty-five to fifty-six mule-teams have been sent to assist the pontoo
November 20, 1864. The command moved on Gordon in two columns, General Kilpatrick, with his cavalry, taking the Clinton road and the river-road toward Macon. General Osterhaus, with the bridge-train, cavalry-train, etc., moved toward Clinton; Clinton; General Blair, with his command, via Bluntsville. The head of the right column encamped at Clinton, and the left near Fortsville. General Kilpatrick waited at Clinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out towaClinton, and the left near Fortsville. General Kilpatrick waited at Clinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out toward Macon, on the left Macon road. He met the enemy's cavalry about four miles from Macon, drove them in, and charged their works, defended by infantry and artillery. The head of his column got inside the works, but could not hold them. He succeClinton until the arrival of the head of the column at twelve M., when he moved out toward Macon, on the left Macon road. He met the enemy's cavalry about four miles from Macon, drove them in, and charged their works, defended by infantry and artillery. The head of his column got inside the works, but could not hold them. He succeeded in reaching the railroad, and destroyed about one mile of the track. The road was struck in two or three places by the cavalry, beside the above, and a train of cars burned. It rained hard during the entire night.
November 23, 1864. The Fourth division, Fifteenth corps, with bridge-train, having roads that were almost impassable, only reached the vicinity of Clinton at night. This morning, fifty-five to fifty-six mule-teams have been sent to assist the pontoon-train through. General Woods's division is moving up this way, abreast of General Corse; General Hazen moving toward Irwinton General Blair moving along the railroad, and destroying it. I propose, with your sanction, to move across the Oconee River at two points; one, six miles below the railroad bridge at Ball's Ferry; the other, two and a half miles above the railroad bridge at Jackson's Ferry. I have already forwarded to you despatches captured. Prisoners still estimate the strength of the enemy in our vicinity about ten thousand. The attack on Walcott was made, I think, by militia, mingled with some old troops retained at Macon. The number of prisoners of war in my hands: In the Seventeenth corps, thirty-five enlisted me
ble to estimate with accuracy the loss of the enemy, but it was very severe. In one regiment, the Fifteenth Arkansas, out of two hundred and ninety-two officers and men, the loss sustained during the siege, according to a history of the defence by a rebel officer, was one hundred and thirty-two, of whom seventy-six fell on the twenty-seventh of May. The force of the enemy within the fortifications numbered from seven to eight thousand, with two thousand five hundred cavalry in our rear at Clinton, and a small force on the west side of the river, commanding a point opposite the enemy's batteries; making, all together, between ten and eleven thousand men engaged in the defence of the position inside and outside the works. The operations in the Teche country, with the losses sustained in battle, and sickness occasioned by rapid and exhausting marches, had reduced my effective force to less than thirteen thousand, including Augur's command. Of these, twenty regiments were nine months