Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Creole (Louisiana, United States) or search for Creole (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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strict appeared the Orleans Guards, The Orleans Guards may boast that, among its privates in 1861, one was G. T. Beauregard. organized by the old members of the company bearing that name, once famous among that militia of which New Orleans has always been deservedly proud. With this new call upon the name, with the hope of active service in the near future, the lists were rapidly filled. Three companies were ready together. The battalion was composed, as always, of the élite of the old Creole population, thus officered: First company, Capt. O. Labatut. Second company, Capt. Chas. Roman. Third company, Capt. Gustav Cruzat. Fourth company, still organizing. In the Fourth district two companies had been formed —still without officers—Numa Augustin; battalion major. A future, lost in clouds, cannot abate the composure of men entirely firm. Christmas came, and with it that good humor which belongs to the season. Every one, whether at home or on the street, seemed to put
, 1841, as second-lieutenant of engineers. He served as acting assistant professor of engineering at West Point from August, 1841, to July, 1842, and as State engineer and surveyor general of Louisiana in 1845. Resigning in the latter year he re-entered the service of the United States in 1847 with appointment as lieutenant-colonel of the Fourteenth infantry, in the brigade commanded by Gen. Franklin Pierce. He was frequently mentioned by General Pierce in his reports as the gallant young Creole colonel. At the battle of Molino del Rey, one of the fiercest of the bloody combats of the valley of Mexico, his gallantry was so conspicuous that he was brevetted colonel. After the war Hebert returned to his home in Louisiana In 1852 he was a member of the convention which met to revise the constitution of his State. In the same year he was elected governor. Soon after the expiration of his term as governor, William Tecumseh Sherman was, through his influence, elected superintendent o